Thank Folk It’s Friday – 30th August


This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

Johnny Flynn has revealed another track from his upcoming LP, the T.S. Eliot inspired “After Eliot”. Details here

– While he’s in the country for BIGSOUND Billy Bragg has announced a single showcase in Sydney. Details here

– Sydney singer-songwriter Rosie Catalano has revealed the details of her new EP including a stream of the first single “Hearts” featuring Jack Carty. Details here

Boy & Bear have released their new video for the single “Three Headed Woman”. Details here

Bluesfest announced their first round of artists for 2014 including John Mayer, The Dave Matthews Band, John Butler Trio, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Iron & Wine, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Devendra Banhart and many many more. Details here

The Little Stevies have revealed details of their upcoming album along with a video of the first single. Details here

– The new EP from Zoe Elliot, Black Dog, has been officially launched along with a video for the first single plus a handful of tour dates this September have been announced. Details here

Caitlin Rose released her new single “Waitin'”. Details here

– Adelaide folk favourites The Timbers have announced an East Coast tour this October. Details here

– It’s great to see the Georgia Fair boys back with some new music and a national tour. Details here

Busby Marou have a new album and a massive national tour due this October. Details here

Tanya Batt will be launching her new EP Atlas in Melbourne next week. Details here

– The latest single from Buffalo Tales is “Puppet Strings”. Details here

– The full lineup for the Dorrigo Folk and Bluegrass Festival has been announced including Mustered Courage, The Company, Lucy Wise and the B’Gollies, The Mid North, Bellyache Ben and The Steamgrass Boys, The Lurkers, Oh Pep!, Rhiannon and Monique and many many more. Details here

– Check out the brand new video from Catherine Traicos and the Starry Night, “Light In The Dark”. Details here

– All of the details of the new album from Lachlan Bryan and The Wildes have been been revealed. Details here

Pete Roe has a brand new video for the track “A Strange Kind of Mystery in the Air”. Details here

– Irish singer-songwriter Foy Vance has announced plans for his first ever Australian tour. Details here

Liam Gale & The Ponytails will be launching their new single “Antipodean Honour” in Sydney next month. Details here


“I’m a big fan of Nick Cave and PJ Harvey, all these guys they just go on stage and you just want to look at them. And, you’re like, ‘I just want to go and have a beer with them afterward,’ I don’t like people coming on stage and you just don’t know who they are. I don’t know, I really like people where you can really feel their personalities”Mélanie Pain chats to Janine Estoesta. Interview here

Releases This Week

StatesThe Paper Kites

Timber and Steel Presents

Asheigh Mannix
Ashleigh Mannix with Al Parkinson, Dan Parsons
Sunday 1st September – The Workers Club, Melbourne, VIC
Tickers on the Door

Buffalo Tales
Buffalo Tales
Frdiay 30th August – Sandbar, Mildura, VIC
Saturday 31st August – Club Legion, Broken Hill, NSW
Sunday 1st September – Cobdolga Club, Cobdolga, SA

Official Site

Fanny Lumsden
Fanny Lumsden & The Thrillseekers
Friday 30th August – Wesley Ann, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 31st August – Baha Tacos, Rye, VIC
Sunday 1st September – Pure Pop Records, St Kilda, VIC

Tickets From Venue

Mark Wilkinson
Mark Wilkinson with Little Bighorn
Friday 30th August – The Heritage Hotel, Bulli, NSW
Saturday 31st August – The Basement, Sydney, NSW
Friday 6th September – The Promethean, Adelaide, SA

Official Site

Gigs Next Week

Ashleigh Mannix
Friday 30th August – Baha Tacos, Rye, VIC
Sunday 1st September – The Workers Club, Melbourne, VIC
Thursday 5th September – The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine, VIC
Friday 6th September – Babushka Lounge, Ballarat, VIC

Friday 6th September – Ya-Ya’s, Perth, WA

Jack Carty
Friday 30th August – The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba, QLD
Saturday 31st August – Joe’s Waterhole, Eumundi, QLD
Sunday 1st September – Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 6th September – Brighton Up Bar, Sydney, NSW

Josh Pyke
Friday 30th August – The Soundlounge, Gold Coast, QLD
Saturday 31st August – The Tivoli, Brisbane, QLD
Thursday 5th September – Prince of Wales, Bunbury, WA
Friday 6th September – Fly By Night, Fremantle, WA

Little Features feat. Joshua Chamberlin, Betty and Oswald, The Conversations, Jacob Pearson
Saturday 31st August – Hibernian House, Sydney, NSW

Major Chord with Brighter Later
Saturday 31st August – Bella Union, Melbourne, VIC

Paul Kelly
Friday 30th August – City Hall, Hobart, TAS

Sam Brittain
Friday 30th August – The Beresford, Sydney, NSW
Saturday 31st August – Barossa Regional Art Gallery, Tanunda, SA
Thursday 5th September – The Grace Emily Hotel, Adelaide, SA

Sam Buckingham
Friday 30th August – The Wheatsheaf, Adelaide, SA

Tanya Batt with Timberwolf, Eliza Hull
Wednesday 4th September – The Toff in Town, Melbourne, VIC

The Go Set with The Real McKenzies
Friday 30th August – Brisbane Hotel, Hobart TAS
Saturday 31st August – Espy Gershwin Room, Melbourne VIC
Sunday 1st September – Barwon Club, Geelong VIC
Wednesday 4th September – ANU Bar, Canberra ACT
Thursday 5th September – Manning Bar, Sydney NSW
Friday 6th September – Miami Tavern Shark Bar, Gold Coast QLD

The Paper Kites
Friday 30th August – The Small Ballroom, Newcastle, NSW
Saturday 31st August – Metro Theatre, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 5th September – The Soundlounge, Gold Coast, QLD
Friday 6th September – The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, QLD

The Timbers
Friday 30th August – The Grace Emily Hotel, Adelaide, SA

The Woohoo Revue
Friday 30th August – Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 31st August – Theatre Royal, Castlemaine, VIC
Friday 6th September – Venue 505, Surry Hills, NSW

Vance Joy with Fraser A. Gorman
Friday 30th August – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, NSW
Saturday 31st August – The Zoo, Brisbane, QLD
Tuesday 3rd September – The Corner, Melbourne, VIC

Friday Folk Flashback

“Two Step” – The Dave Matthews Band

With the announcement of The Dave Matthews Band on the 2014 Bluesfest lineup this week I couldn’t help but share with you the song that made me fall in love with them so many years ago. Their appearance at Bluesfest is going to be epic!

Liam Gale Announces Sydney Single Launch

Liam Gale
Image Courtesy of Liam Gale & The Ponytails

Experimental folk outfit Liam Gale & The Ponytails have announced plans to launch their brand new single “Antipodean Honour” at GoodGod Small Club in their hometown of Sydney on Thursday 12th September. The launch is part of Tomorrow Never Knows, a night of blues, roots and psychedelia also featuring The Spoon Collectors and Aether Beach, plus a bunch of intermittent artists including drummers, burlesque dancers and more.

The night kicks off at 8pm with tickets $15 (plus booking fee) available here. For more information check out the official Facebook event.

Foy Vance Announces First Ever Australian Tour

Foy Vance
Image Courtesy of Foy Vance

Celebrated Irish singer-songwriter Foy Vance and his incredible moustache has announced plans for his first ever Australian tour this October. Vance will release his new album Joy of Nothing in Australia next week and the buzz around his Australian tour – and the fact it only features three dates – is definitely growing.

Check out the full list of dates below – tickets are on sale now:

Thursday 10th October – The Basement, Sydney, NSW
Saturday 12th October – The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, VIC (w/ The Handsome Family)
Sunday 13th October – Lizottes, Newcastle, NSW

New Pete Roe Video, “A Strange Kind of Mystery in the Air”

Pete Roe
Image Courtesy of Pete Roe

There’s a chance you know Pete Roe as the sometimes-touring pianist for Laura Marling (he famously shaved off his beard mid set at a Laura Marling concert in Sydney a few years back) or for his really interesting solo work that has evolved from it’s jazzy beginnings to his current folky sounds.

Pete Roe’s latest album is Our Beloved Bubble and his new single, “A Strange Kind of Mystery in the Air”, is a lovely slice of folk goodness. Check out the Lorn Macdonald directed video below:

Details of the New Album from Lachlan Bryan and The Wildes

Lachlan Bryan
Image Courtesy of Lachlan Bryan and The Wildes

A couple of months ago we brought you the tantalising news that Lachlan Bryan had hooked up with his old band The Wildes and headed back into the studio to record a brand new album, along with some special guests including Bill Chambers, Melody Pool, Zoe Rinkel and Laura Coates (The Weeping Willows).

Well now we can give you a little bit more information on the release. The album is titled Black Coffee and is due for release on the 20th September – you can pre-order it here. That’s the cover art at the top of the piece and the full track listing is below:

1. 309 (with Bill Chambers)
2. Big Fish
3. You, Me and The Blues
4. Deathwish Country
5. Dragging my Chain (with Zoe Rinkel)
6. Back Coffee
7. Change in the Wind
8. The CEO Must Die
9. Kiss Me or Kill Me
10. 40 Days and Nights (with Melody Pool)

Can’t wait to hear some of this new music from Lachlan Bryan and The Wildes!

New Catherine Traicos and the Starry Night Video “Light In The Dark”

Catherine Traicos
Image Courtesy of Catherine Traicos and the Starry Night

Catherine Traicos and the Starry Night have been hard at work on their new album The Earth, the Sea, the Moon, the Sky, which is due for release in November this year. The first single from the album is “Light In The Dark” which has a brand new video directed by Edwin Budhi. Check it out below:

Artists for the 2013 Dorrigo Folk and Bluegrass Festival

Mustered Courage
Image Courtesy of Mustered Courage

Every year I look at the Dorrigo Folk and Bluegrass Festival lineup and want to go, but every year something comes up and I don’t make it. But in 2013 I’ve made a commitment to make it to the Northern NSW festival and no matter what comes up I’ll be there.

Which is a good thing as the 2013 Dorrigo Folk and Bluegrass Festival features some of Timber and Steel’s favourite artists including Mustered Courage (above), The Company, Lucy Wise and the B’Gollies, The Mid North, Bellyache Ben and The Steamgrass Boys, The Lurkers, Oh Pep!, Rhiannon and Monique and many many more.

The Dorrigo Folk and Bluegrass Festival is held on the 25th, 26th and 27th October in Dorrigo, NSW with tickets available from the official site here. The full list of artists announced for the festival (so far) are below:

The Foghorn StringBand, Charlie Walden and Patt Plunkett, Bluegrass Parkway, Ross Nickerson, Mustered Courage, Appalachian Heaven String Band, The Company, The Hottentots – Carl & Parissa, Lucy Wise and the B’Gollies, Starboard Cannons, Ange Tackats and Band, The Mid North, Cat and Clint, Gleny Rae Virus and her Playboys, Bellyache Ben and The Steamgrass Boys, Oh Pep!, The Lurkers, Rhiannon and Monique, Don & John – Resonator Brothers, Evan Mathieson and more

Interview: An Afternoon with Mélanie Pain

Melanie Pain
Image Courtesy of Mélanie Pain

On a most beautiful and sun drenched Parisian afternoon in Le Marais, Janine Estoesta met with Mélanie Pain (a front woman for Nouvelle Vague) to discuss her latest album and recent tours. Pain already reaching critical acclaim for her new album and her work as a solo artist, talks of her past work both as her own and with her previous collective.

Janine Estoesta: So, Bye Bye Manchester – you released it last year?

Mélanie Pain: In Australia, yes. It was the first release and I don’t know, it always happens. It was like when I released my first album, I am very close to my producer in Australia and he’s really quick to release things. I send him the album and he says, ‘yeah, it’s OK, I’ll release it in six months.’ And, it’s different timing in Europe, it takes more time and I’m recording more songs and you know, tour a little bit before releasing the album. So, it’s kind of – I release my album one year ago and the same album will be released in France and the UK and in Canada in September. One year apart. In between, it was released in Germany and in Asia.

JE: What is your fan base like in Asia?

MP: It’s good, like, I’m doing really good, but every time I play in Singapore I’ve got a bit of follow up and, I don’t know. It’s just people that like French music and these big events and I really like going there. They’re really receptive to the culture.

JE: So, you’ve kind of just been touring this year – it’s kind of like huge blocks isn’t it?

MP: Yep. I’ve been touring non-stop ever since last November, I think. So, I’ve been in Australia in January – great tour – and then, I’ve been to Singapore and then to England and then I don’t really remember. It’s just – I’ve been touring a lot. And, I’ve been to the US for five weeks with Nouvelle Vague. So, on the road non-stop.

JE: So, you’re collaboration with Ed Harcourt. Amazing. How did that come about – did you guys just want to work together?

MP: I’m a big fan of him and I think he didn’t know me (laughs). I’m a really big fan and I just sent him a message on Facebook like, ‘hey. Here I am, I really love your work, I’m in Manchester writing my new album, I don’t know. Maybe, I can come to London and we can meet and we can work together?’ And, he instantly asked me if I wanted to come and spend three days in his studio in London. So, I went there, I didn’t know him, so he picked me up at the Metro station. It was really weird, like, I went from Manchester to London and I got out of the Metro to wait and thought, ‘is this really him? Maybe it’s a joke, maybe it’s a Facebook – maybe, it’s a trick or something.’ I was waiting and suddenly I just saw this guy, all tattoos everywhere, big sunglasses, on a bike and he said, ‘hey! Are you the French girl?’ (laughs) OK, so that’s the real one. And, we’ve been working in his studio for three days and we wrote three songs and we did a duet called “Black Widow” and I invited him to sing with me at a jazz cafe in London in April and we keep kind of trying to work together. He invited me back in a pub to do a support of one gig and he comes to south of France for holidays so we’re probably going to try and meet there. It’s amazing how Facebook – I still can’t believe I just messaged him on Facebook and then meet the real person out of the Metro, he picked me up and then straight to his studio. And, he is a genius. He is a genius.

JE: He is. You guys really compliment each other really well. Was there anyone else that you wanted to collaborate with?

MP: Yeah, I wrote all the songs and then I asked this guy called Albin de la Simone who is kind of getting big in France now. And, he helped me find the sound of the album and everything, he just produced it. I’m really happy to work with him, he’s really famous in France too. He’s a kind of genius as well (laughs). But, on this album, Ed Harcourt was the only one that I wanted to work with as a vocalist because I really wanted “Bye Bye Manchester” to really be my kind of baby. The first album was written with a lot of people, with a lot of “featurings” on it and this one was really more, ‘OK, I’m going to be in a bedroom and write all the songs myself,’ and Ed Harcourt was the exception (laughs). But, I really wanted it to be all personal, because I’ve been working with Nouvelle Vague for ten years, my first album I worked with five or six different people. So, this time was like, ‘OK, this is my album, this is me.’

JE: So, that’s why Bye Bye Manchester sounds so different to “My Name” – with all those influences from other people, is this album definitely Mélanie Pain?

MP: Well, “My Name” is really different. It was two completely different processes. You know, I wasn’t a singer ten years ago. Then, this guy from Nouvelle Vague – I sung a demo for my boyfriend who was looking for a singer for his project, he was a musician. I was always surrounded by musicians, but never really take a mic or played an instrument. And, I recorded this demo and he gave this demo to everyone saying, ‘listen to this track, I’m looking for a female singer.’ And, the guy that was doing Nouvelle Vague at this point called him and said, ‘who’s that girl that was singing on your demo?’ And, he said, ‘oh, that’s my girlfriend! But, she’s not a singer.’ Then, he said, ‘but, I like her voice, can she come?’ That’s how I became a singer, this guy just liked my voice. I came and I recorded the first Nouvelle Vague album with him and then six months later, he called me and said, ‘OK, there’s one gig in Paris, do you want to do it?’ and, I said, ‘yes!’ And then, six months later he said, ‘OK, there’s a tour in America, do you want to do it?’ and I said ‘yes.’ You know, I began like this and while I was touring with Nouvelle Vague people were come with songs for me saying ‘why don’t you sing my song?’ That’s how “My Name” was created. People were coming to me with great songs and I loved it, I wanted to sing it. Then I asked, ‘can I change the words? Can I write my own lyrics?’ and that’s why I think “My Name” is really, lots of musical references because all the people were coming and saying, ‘oh, I see you doing folk, kind of sixties style,’ it was hard with “My Name” to keep a musical direction. It was kind of, I just sang all the songs that I really liked and I wrote two or three songs on the album at the end. But, it was not really, you know – compared to “Bye Bye Manchester” it was so different. I went to Manchester and didn’t listen to any music and I played with my little keyboards and played with what I can, which is nothing – because, I’m not a musician. I kind of found my sounds and my way of writing, just by myself, without any reference or musical knowledge (laughs). It was really on instinct, I was like, ‘OK, that’s what I want to sing.’ Because, I was frustrated at the end of “My Name,” to sing other people’s lyrics and other people’s songs. I need to sing something that is deep inside me, and I’ve been doing that with Nouvelle Vague for years, so I was ready now. I don’t know, I think in the future, I think “Bye Bye Manchester” is the first stone in my career as a writer and singer. Because, it’s the first time I really own all the songs. So, we’ll see how it goes, but I’m really proud (laughs). It’s hard for me to sing my first album songs live and everything.

JE: So, that’s why there were that three year hiatus between My Name and Bye Bye Manchester?

MP: Well, I had a baby as well. Took me a bit more than a year (laughs) and then it took me a big year to get really confident about my writing, because it was hard. And, I kept touring all the way during this period. It was hard for me, that’s why I really felt the need to go into one place without anyone, just in my bedroom with the stuff I bring from Paris and that’s it – I got to write. Ten or fifteen songs and just go. That’s how I did it because it was so hard to be on tour, have a baby, come back, be on tour again and find time in between stuff to just concentrate on writing songs. I think I just had really high expectations. Everything I wrote for six months, I just threw in the bin and thought, “you’re never going to be a writer.” Yeah, I lost faith at some point. I don’t know, I wrote one song, I wrote “7 ou 8 fois” and that’s what I want to do, I found a base that I can build on.

JE: So, what’s the kind of story behind Bye Bye Manchester?

MP: I realised when I was writing all the songs, they were about going somewhere else. Start a new life, kind of this sort of stuff. I called my album Bye Bye Manchester because Manchester is really a city where people are so proud to be Manchurians, you know, Manchester people. They are really proud. Everyone wants to go out, they want to leave Manchester because, the weather is shitty, maybe it’s too strong of an identity city, and sometimes you really feel like you just have to go away and that’s why all the things in my head were gathering in Manchester. And, that’s why I called it “Bye Bye Manchester” because you have to say “bye, bye” to everything you know to kind of, of course, a bit later come back and be strong about where you are and everything. Every song is about this fantasy to go away and you only want to go away because you will be able to come back. So, the song “7 ou 8 fois” it means “seven or eight times I tried to do this, I tried to,” I tried to just move on. It’s this eighth time it worked and I can kind of come back to it. So, it’s kind of this feeling that, deeply, you want to go, but in fact, you don’t want to go – you just want to be happy where you are. I don’t know. Manchester was great for this – my dream was to go into Manchester and write an album. Because, I am a big fan of Morrissey and The Smiths and all these new wave – Joy Division and Buzzcocks – everything down there. To write good music, you have to be English and live in Manchester or Liverpool. And, it’s all about this ambiguity all the time, you know? Why do you want to leave? Why are you really sick of where you are? All the songs are talking about this, and I don’t know. I just realised that I completely said goodbye to my other life, becoming a singer and the fact that it was really important for me to do that and I didn’t know. The fact of deciding this strengthened everything else, so voila. It was all about these feelings. But, it was not really conscious, I really wrote all these songs and at the end I said, “Oh, my God. They’re all talking about-” This song called “Ailleurs” is meaning “Somewhere else” and “Bye Bye Manchester” obviously, “Je Laisse Tomber” means “I quit everything.” And, all these lyrics, they were all talking about the same thing and how important it was for me to take all these big decisions in my life. I was living in South of France and decided to go to Paris, then in Paris, I decided to quit all my work and everything and become a singer and then when I was a singer, I decided to write my own songs. And, all of these decisions are not enough. I have to change to recreate my life and everything. So, that’s it.

Becoming and singer and writing my own lyrics and own songs was really important to me. I needed to find my way of communicating with these people that were coming to my concerts, so I was, “OK, I have to be true, I don’t want to sing other people’s songs all the time.” So, yeah.

JE: And, that’s obviously how it was in the beginning with Nouvelle Vague?

MP: Yes. I really learnt everything with Nouvelle Vague, I’ve been doing with them a thousand shows, I think. And, everything I know, all the confidence I have on stage is from this experience. As well as all the traveling I did with them, we were traveling all the time everywhere. It was really important. I never traveled before Nouvelle Vague and then suddenly, I was never in Paris. The first five years, when it was really successful, I was just flying everywhere and that really opened my mind about what I really liked. I didn’t want to stay in the same place, I really liked to meet people and be in danger all the time in different environment and different cultural challenges and stuff like this. So, yeah, I think this was really the big impasse for me, to travel and to make my own stuff. So, it’s good.

JE: Bye Bye Manchester really blew my mind away, it was so different. But, now it makes sense, because it’s really you. Which is another thing because you’ve always been this strong female and feminine presence in music. Having major influences like Smiths and Joy Division, would you say that that’s where you’ve gotten your stage presence from?

MP: I don’t know. What was amazing for me, going on stage for the first time in my life, with Nouvelle Vague ten years ago – it’s going to be ten years next year. I never went on stage in my whole life, I never did theatres or anything. And, when I was on stage, it was really natural. I just had to sing the songs and talk to people and make them laugh and just tell them how I feel. I was like, “oh, my god, it’s quite simple.” Like, for me, it was kind of – I was very shy at the point, I wasn’t the person that I am now. I had this strength that I didn’t know about. I could go on stage and be completely comfortable and look in the eyes of the audience and try and see what they want. I was completely okay with them being bored or super happy, or talking, I’m really interested in that. I really like when I sing a song to see, ‘oh, this one is bored, this one is happy (laughs).’ I really like that, I’m not scared if they don’t like me or, shit, I’m not dressed up or whatever. I don’t really think about it, I’m just sharing this unique moment with people and it’s unique. I do a lot of shows, this day is Tuesday and it’s ten-fifteen and this guy is yawning, it’s unique and I’m never going to live that again. I’m like this and I don’t know about having any role model of artists, I just like people that come on stage and you can really see their personality and they are themselves, they’re not building a character or whatever. Oh well, they’re building a character but it’s actually them, but kind of, a stronger version of them. I’m a big fan of Nick Cave and PJ Harvey, all these guys they just go on stage and you just want to look at them. And, you’re like, ‘I just want to go and have a beer with them afterward,’ I don’t like people coming on stage and you just don’t know who they are. I don’t know, I really like people where you can really feel their personalities. And, I realised that I could do that, that I can actually do that and be exactly the same. I really remember when I was having my baby, I was touring with him – he was like two months old – and, I was just breastfeeding backstage and just giving the baby to my sister and just going on stage and I was exactly the same person. People were saying, ‘Don’t you need some time to be -?’ and, I was like no, I don’t want to be another person. Like, if I could go on stage with my baby on my breast then I would go. Because, for me music is – well, I’m not this kind of artist where I just want to hide, I just want to be myself.

JE: Now, do you have any underground or unsigned musicians that you’re really interested in, at the moment?

MP: Well, I have a lot of friends that are doing a lot of interesting stuff. They’re all kind of getting signed. Well, there’s not this kind of “signing” event anymore. Like, they’re all releasing their stuff, even if they’re doing it by themselves. I really like this band called Team Ghost, electro stuff. I don’t know, there’s a lot of stuff that I know and like, but underground… I don’t know if it exists anymore. Suddenly, they have a website and they’re all over Facebook and YouTube. I remember I went to a Ben Harper show when he released his first album and I don’t know if he was even big in America at the time, but we were like ten in the venue and all sitting down with Ben Harper in the middle. Oh, my god, this was really underground. And, one year later…

JE: Do you prefer doing smaller and more intimate shows as appose to bigger venues?

MP: I like both, in fact. I’m not such a fan of big venues. Even with Nouvelle Vague when we do big venues. Just in terms of space, it’s a really long way to see the peoples faces and you’re like, ‘what is that?’ So, I’m more into small shows and I don’t know, Sydney Festival was in Town Hall and it’s a beautiful, beautiful venue with one thousand people. This is the biggest that I can kind of like, more than this is just ridiculous. In Paris, I do this little club, I did two shows and then I’m going to do three around September, October and November in this small like two hundred sitting little theatre. And, I really like that, people really listen and you feel you have time. You have your time and your space. Really intimate, I like it.

JE: So, I know that you’re still with Nouvelle Vague but, do you miss that constant group setting?

MP: Mmm… Not for the moment. I like being by myself and kind of controlling everything and it’s faster and quicker and more rewarding (laughs). No, more the moment I just miss the fun with Nouvelle Vague. It’s great conditions and when you tour it’s always a lot of people, it’s always really easy. It’s a bit more complicated with my shows., you really have to try and you really have to set up everything. It’s less comfortable and it’s a lot of work and a lot of energy but, really, I feel so happy when I just tour by myself. I can still do both though and get my balance with the collective and the solo. We’ll see. I’m still amazed that Nouvelle Vague is still touring so much.

JE: Um. So, what’s your take on chocolate milkshakes?

MP: (laughs) If ever I taste a good one, I’ll be happy! I don’t know, it’s always so artificial to me. I want someone to make one for me with real stuff, real chocolate, real milk, real ice-cream. But, I love fruit, so if it’s good, I love it!

New Buffalo Tales Single “Puppet Strings”

Buffalo Tales
Image Courtesy of Buffalo Tales

By now you’ve no doubt heard the awesome new album from Buffalo Tales, Roadtrip Confessions, and possibly even seen the man himself live as he’s toured the country for Timber and Steel. If you haven’t we’ve got another taste for you with the brand new Buffalo Tales single “Puppet Strings” now streaming online.

When we interviewed Buffalo Tales, AKA Wes Carr, in July he made it clear that “Puppet Strings” is not necessarily about his experience working with a major record label. “It’s really a comment on general society,” Carr explaned. “I can only write from my own experience and my own thoughts and opinions. It’s more of a comment about how people are coaxed into this way of life that they think they should be – they’ve got to get the top job because Dad’s going to be proud of me or whatever. But really inside they want to travel or do something. I think everybody has a certain thing that they’ve had to compromise to fit into a certain pigeon hole.”

Take a listen to “Puppet Strings” below:

Tanya Batt Announces Atlas EP Launch

Tanya Batt
Image Courtesy of Tanya Batt

Melbourne singer-songwriter Tanya Batt has been getting quite a bit of buzz recently with local and overseas airplay, a feature on Clare Bowditch’s Qantas and Jetstar playlists and a bunch of love from the blogosphere (ourselves included).

Tanya Batt will be launching her new EP Atlas at The Toff in Town on the 4th September. The EP features the songs “Secret Doors and Passageways”, “Jail Birds” and the title track “Atlas” that features the wonderful Hayden Calnin. For more details on the EP launch, which features supports from Timberwolf and Eliza Hull, check out the official Facebook event here.

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