Thank Folk It’s Friday – 22nd December

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

– We picked our top 25 albums and EPs of 2017 including releases from All Our Exes Live in Texas, BATTS, Billy Bragg, Charlie Fink, David Rawlings, Emily Barker, Fanny Lumsden, Gretta Ziller, Husky, Johnny Flynn, Kasey Chambers, Lankum, Laura Marling, Lisa Mitchell, Nick Mulvey, Offa Rex, Old Crow Medicine Show, Packwood, Paul Kelly, Stu Larsen, The Ahern Brothers, The East Pointers, The Morrisons, Timothy James Bowen and Willie Watson. Details here

– We reached out to the Timber and Steel community to get them to pick their top albums of the year. The results are wonderful with well over 100 artists contributing. Details here

– Our Editor In Chief Gareth Hugh Evans picked his top 25 tracks of 2016 including songs from All Our Exes Live in Texas, BATTS, Billy Bragg, Charlie Fink, David Rawlings, Diamond Duck, Emma Davis, Fanny Lumsden, Gretta Ziller, I’m With Her, Johnny Flynn, Julia Johnson, Laura Marling, Nick Mulvey, Offa Rex, Paul Kelly, Stella Donnelly, Stu Larsen, Taryn La Fauci, The Ahern Brothers, The East Pointers, The Morrisons feat. Georgia Mooney, The Northern Folk, The Young’uns, and Willie Watson. Details here

– We review The Beautiful Girls in Sydney. Details here

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Gretta Ziller and Andrew Swift

Gretta Ziller

Gretta Ziller and Andrew Swift kick off their summer holiday tour of caravan parks around the nation. Will they stumble across your holiday park?

Wednesday 27th December – Discovery Parks Lake Hume, Ebden, VIC
Thursday 28th December – Porepunkah Bridge Holiday Park, Porepunkah, VIC
Friday 29th December – Omeo Caravan Park, Omeo, VIC

Gigs Next Week

A Celtic Christmas feat. Damien Leith, Claymore
Saturday 23rd December – The Palms at Crown, Melbourne, VIC

A Country Christmas Revue feat. Raised By Eagles, Lost Ragas, The Ahern Brothers, Sarah Carroll
Friday 22nd December – Theatre Royal, Castlemaine, VIC

A Very Country Christmas feat. James Ellis, Cold Heart, Roz Girvan, Bakersfield Glee Club
Saturday 23rd December – The Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC

A Xmas Happening Love In! feat. Zoùkeys, Hippy Trippy Trio, Jewels’ Blues Explosion
Friday 22nd December – The Bank, Melbourne, VIC

Alex The Astronaut
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Lost Paradise, Glenworth Valley, NSW

Andrew Swift
Saturday 23rd December – King Island Club, Currie, TAS
Wednesday 27th December – Discovery Parks Lake Hume, Ebden, VIC
Thursday 28th December – Porepunkah Bridge Holiday Park, Porepunkah, VIC
Friday 29th December – Omeo Caravan Park, Omeo, VIC

Andy Baylor
Friday 22nd December – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

Benjamin Roberts w/ Daniel J. Townsend
Thursday 27th December – Grace Emily Hotel, Adelaide, SA

Breaking Trad
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

Cat Canteri and Justin Bernasconi
Saturday 23rd December – The Bridge, Castlemaine, VIC

Craig Woodward
Sunday 24th December – Loretta’s, Melbourne, VIC

Dane Blacklock, Velvajayne
Saturday 23rd December – LazyBones Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Darren Hanlon
Friday 22nd December –
Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 23rd December – The Old Museum
, Brisbane, QLD

Edgelarks
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

Eleanor McEvoy
Friday 29th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

Falls Festival
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Lorne, VIC
Friday 29th to Sunday 31st December – Marion Bay, TAS

Fleet Foxes
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Lorne, VIC
Friday 29th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Marion Bay, TAS

Get Folked Punk Xmas Blowout feat. Vetty Vials & The Sandpit Turtles, Whispering Jackie, Jonno Read, Billy Demos, Billy Puntton, Uke-paley, Jethro Morris, Ess-em, Sooze
Friday 22nd December – LazyBones Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Good Option
Friday 22nd December – Some Velvet Morning, Melbourne, VIC

Gretta Ziller and Andrew Swift
Wednesday 27th December – Discovery Parks Lake Hume, Ebden, VIC
Thursday 28th December – Porepunkah Bridge Holiday Park, Porepunkah, VIC
Friday 29th December – Omeo Caravan Park, Omeo, VIC

Handsome Young Strangers, Steph Miller and Jim Mongrel’s Anti-Christmas Bash
Saturday 23rd December – MoshPit, Sydney, NSW

Helen Townsend
Friday 22nd December – Amble Inn, Corindi, NSW
Saturday 23rd December – The Naked Bean, South Grafton, NSW

Honey
Monday 25th December – Parklands Resort, Mudgee, NSW

James Bennett
Friday 22nd December – Avoca Beach Hotel & Resort, Avoca Beach, NSW
Saturday 23rd December – The Lounge Room, Port Macquarie, NSW
Sunday 24th December – Town Green Inn Port Macquarie, Port Macquarie, NSW
Friday 29th December – Sacred Tree Markets, Nelson Bay, NSW

Jess Locke
Saturday 23rd December – Reverence Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

John Butler
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

Julia Jacklin
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Lorne, VIC
Friday 29th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Marion Bay, TAS

Justin Bernasconi
Friday 22nd December – The Guildford Family Hotel, Guildford, VIC
Saturday 23rd December – The Bridge, Castlemaine, VIC

Kallidad
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Lorne, VIC

Lost Paradise
Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st December – Glenworth Valley, NSW

Mick Thomas & The Roving Commission
Friday 22nd December – Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 23rd December – Caravan Club, Melbourne, VIC
Sunday 24th December – Caravan Club, Melbourne, VIC

Microwave Jenny
Sunday 24th December – Bombini, Avoca Beach, NSW

Molsky’s Mountain Drifters
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

One Hot Night feat. Busby Marou, Amy Shark, Timberwolf, Pandamic
Friday 29th December – Rockhampton Showgrounds, Rockhampton, QLD

Pam Hata
Sunday 24th December – The Duck on Clarence, Port Macquarie, NSW
Thursday 28th December – Oasis by the River, North Haven, NSW

Pierce Brothers
Friday 29th December – Lorne Hotel, Lorne, VIC

Rita B
Saturday 23rd December – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

Sleepy Dreamers, Arbes, Sean Watson
Friday 22nd December – The Workers Club, Melbourne, VIC

That Red Head
Saturday 23rd December – Wayward Brewing Company, Sydney, NSW
Friday 29th December – LazyBones Lounge, Sydney, NSW

The Beautiful Girls
Thursday 28th December – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

The Bluegrass Playgirls with GlenyRae & JennyShimmin, Robbie Long & Smithy
Saturday 23rd December – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

The Demon Drink
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

The Drunken Poachers
Saturday 23rd December – Labour in Vain, Melbourne, VIC

The East Pointers
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

The Heggarties and Matt J Ward
Friday 22nd December – Exeter Hotel, Adelaide, SA

The Railsplitters
Friday 29th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford Folk Festival, Woodford, QLD

The Teskey Brothers
Friday 29th to Sunday 31st December – Falls Festival, Marion Bay, TAS

This Way North
Saturday 23rd December – Aireys Pub, Aireys Inlet, VIC
Friday 29th December – Tanswells Hotel, Beechworth, VIC

Woodford Folk Festival
Wednesday 27th December to Monday 1st January – Woodford, QLDFriday Folk Flashback

“How to Make Gravy” – Paul Kelly

Timber and Steel’s Top Albums of 2017

Merle

It’s difficult to find an overriding theme in our picks for this year’s top albums. There’s a bit of trad in there, a lot of singer-songwriter and a decent amount Americana and country music. Overall 2017 has been another amazing year for folk music and we couldn’t be happier.

As always we have more “best of” lists coming this week so please stay tuned for them. But in the meantime check out Timber and Steel’s top albums of

Offa Rex
1. Offa RexThe Queen of Hearts
When you get nostalgia right the result can be pure gold. As someone who was brought up on late-60s/early-70s English folk-rock (think Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span, Pentangle, etc) The Queen of Hearts feels like home and, as my friends and family can attest, the album has truly been on constant rotation since its release in July.

Offa Rex is the coming together of Portland nu-folk heroes The Decemberists and English folk-singer Olivia Chaney, inspired by the second-wave folk revival of the British isles. Somehow they’ve managed to capture this very distinct period of music, staying true to the instrumentation, production values and aesthetic of the time without descending into kitsch or parody (as many of the bands from the time ended up doing themselves in the 70s and 80s). Rigid rock rhythm sections over murder ballads, harpsichords and reverb-heavy electric guitars, ethereal vocals – The Queen of Hearts feels more like a rediscovered gem than an album recorded and released in 2017.

And let’s make one thing clear – it’s Olivia Chaney who makes this record. While The Decemberists are obviously the driving force behind The Queen of Hearts it is Chaney’s vocals that pull you right back into the early 70s. She somehow channels the likes of Maddy Prior, Sandy Denny, Anne Briggs, et al, while still bringing her own unique sound to the vocals. The tracks where Colin Meloy takes the lead (such as “Black Leg Minor”) or the instrumental “Constant Billy (Oddington) / I’ll Go Enlist (Sherborne)”, while still amazing in their own right, just don’t have the same impact as “The Queen of Hearts”, “Flash Company”, “The Old Churchyard” or any of the other amazing songs with Olivia Chaney front and centre.

Picking favourite songs from an album of standouts is very very hard. I love the nods to early Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath on “Sheepcrook and Black Dog”, probably the most epic of all the songs on the album. “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” is a beautiful tribute to Anne Briggs, with Chaney’s voice just resonating over the drone of a harmonium. And Offa Rex’s version of “Willie o’ Winsbury” may be my favourite of all time.

Even if you only have a passing interest in British folk music, in the second wave folk revival or in The Decemberists’ ongoing evolution as one of the most interesting folk bands in the world, give The Queen of Hearts a listen and see exactly why this is our album of the year for 2017.

The East Pointers
2. The East PointersWhat We Leave Behind
Canadian trio The East Pointers up the production ante with their new album What We Leave Behind, expanding their sound with new instrumentation, increasing their song-to-tune ratio and generally producing one of the most interesting folk albums of the year. And the best part about it is there’s still a focus on ensuring that every bit of the album can be reproduced live with just the three of them – something I can confirm is the case having caught them in Melbourne recently. What We Leave Behind sees The East Pointers grow as a band, deftly straddling the worlds of traditional and modern fold music.

The Ahern Brothers
3. The Ahern BrothersThe Ahern Brothers
Josh Rennie-Hynes and Steve Grady are two voices that seem destined to be together. The Ahern Brothers are the latest in collection of modern artists taking inspiration from close harmony singing in the vein of The Everly Brothers and Simon & Garfunkel and the result is really something special. Their self-titled debut album is a pure delight and elevates everything we’ve heard from Rennie-Hynes and Grady individually to date. There’s a reason these guys are selling out shows and taking the country by storm.

Fanny Lumsden
4. Fanny LumsdenReal Class Act
Fanny Lumsden continues her domination of Australian country music with the 2017 release of Real Class Act. The album is very strongly informed by Lumsden’s decision to live her life on the road with husband Dan Stanley Freeman rather than opting for the relative comfort of a major Australian city (where, let’s be honest, the vast majority of Australia’s country music is produced), and you can really hear the expanse of our wide brown land all over the album. With each release Fanny Lumsden’s songwriting just gets better and better, adding a modern sensibility to a genre that all to often falls into cliche or nostalgia. Real Class Act is what Australian country music should be about.

The Morrisons
5. The MorrisonsThe Morrisons
Australia’s premiere bluegrass and alt-country band The Morrisons released their long-awaited and highly anticipated debut album this year and it has fast become one of my favourite album’s of ever. No one quite takes such a quintessentially American genre like bluegrass and passes it through the Australian lens in the way The Morrisons do. And it doesn’t hurt that individually each of The Morrisons is a master of their respective instrument making the album as technically brilliant as it is artistically brilliant.

Willie Watson
6. Willie WatsonFolksinger Vol. 2
Willie Watson’s exploration of America’s rich vein of traditional folk music continues with the second volume in his Folksinger series. Somehow he finds a way to take traditional and vintage folk and blues songs and modernise them without losing what makes them great songs to begin with. Watson treats this material with respect and reverance, almost taking a step back and letting each song speak for itself. When Willie Watson left Old Crow Medicine Show he expressed a desire to find a softer side of the folk genre, and that’s something he’s truly captured with Folksinger Vol. 2.

All Our Exes Live In Texas
7. All Our Exes Live In TexasWhen We Fall
Taking out this year’s ARIA for Best Blues and Roots Album was just the icing on the cake for what has been a massive year for All Our Exes Live In Texas. When We Fall is an album of fine songwriting, pitch perfect production and a true celebration of the four part harmony. Elana Stone, Katie Wighton, Hannah Crofts and Georgia Mooney each bring a unique set of influences and musical styles to All Our Exes Live In Texas which somehow all blend together into something sublime. With the momentum on When We Fall expect All Our Exes Live In Texas to continue crushing it into 2018 and beyond

Laura Marling
8. Laura MarlingSemper Femina
Laura Marling goes deep on her exploration of the feminine and what it means to be a female artist. It’s amazing to watch Marling grow with every album she releases while never really losing track of what drew us all to her in the first place – beautifully written songs and masterful guitar work. Laura Marling truly is one of the greatest artists of our generation.

Charlie Fink
9. Charlie FinkCover My Tracks
My love for Cover My Tracks one hundred per cent stems from my nostalgia for Noah and The Whale’s 2009 concept album The First Days of Spring. Charlie Fink revisits the style and feeling from The First Days of Spring throughout his 2017 solo outing and it’s a welcome return to form for a songwriter that had definitely strayed a little far from his strengths towards the end of Noah and The Whale’s time, prefering a Springsteen-light pop sound to substantial, heart-on-his-sleeve songwriting. The album is raw, emotional, beautiful and heartbreaking – everything I want from a Charlie Fink record.

Packwood
10. PackwoodVertumnus
The culmination four seasonally focused EPs from the last couple of years, Vertumnus is a beautiful opus to the natural world. Packwood’s unique brand of chamber folk has reached its pinnacle with this record, filled with lush compositions and stunning musicianship. Bayden Hyne, along with his arrangers Tilman Robinson (orchestral) and Miriam Crellin (choral) have pefectly crafted each track on Vertumnus making the most of choirs, strings, pianos, finger-picked guitars and banjos and more to compliment Packwood’s trademark fragile vocal style. Taking this work out of the studio and onto the stage is an expensive undertaking but I still hold out hope that we’ll see Vertumnus live before too long.

Kasey Chambers
11. Kasey ChambersDragonfly
Kasey Chambers mixes things up on her latest double album working with two different producers – Paul Kelly and Nash Chambers – and collaborating with a diverse range of artists from multiple genres, resulting in one of her most interesting releases in recent years.

David Rawlings
12. David RawlingsPoor David’s Almanack
David Rawlings and Gillian Welch find a way to write original Americana songs that sound like traditional songs that have been re-discovered and updated for a modern audience – and why can’t I get “Money is the Meat in the Coconut” out of my head?

Billy Bragg
13. Billy BraggBridges Not Walls
Billy Bragg returns to his activist roots on this EP with his electric guitar turned up and his wit as sharp as ever.

Lisa Mitchell
14. Lisa MitchellWhen They Play That Song
Out of no where Australia’s queen of indie-folk delivers the sweetest covers EP of the year, with quirky takes on 90s favourites from Phantom Planet, Spice Girls, Placebo, Letters To Cleo and The Cardigans

Timothy James Bowen
15. Timothy James BowenBloom
Bloom bookends a couple of years of massive upheaval in Timothy James Bowen’s life, while capturing an artist at the peak of his powers as a singer and songwriter.

Husky
16. HuskyPunchbuzz
Husky continue to push the boundaries of their indie-folk sound with an album that borrows as much from eighties pop as it does from lyric-driven singer-songwriter music.

BATTS
17. BATTS62 Moons
Moving away from her electro-folk roots toward a stripped back sound has proven a success for BATTS who’s delivered an EP of really stunning songs.

Gretta Ziller
18. Gretta ZillerQueen of Boomtown
Gretta Ziller has delivered one of the best Americana albums of the year that deserves all the nominations, awards and accolades it will no doubt continue to receive over the coming months

Paul Kelly
19. Paul KellyLife Is Fine
After a couple of genre projects Paul Kelly returns with his most Paul Kelly album in recent memory, further cementing him as Australia’s greatest living songwriter.

Nick Mulvey
20. Nick MulveyWake Up Now
The English singer-songwriter continues to produce interesting, acoustic driven indie music full of weird guitar tunings, multi-tracked vocals and songs just waiting to hit a Hollywood soundtrack.

Emily Barker
21. Emily BarkerSweet Kind of Blue
Emily Barker deftly combines country, blues and folk styles, harkening back to a tradition while still producing a sound that is fresh and engaging.

Stu Larsen
22. Stu LarsenResolute
Australia’s favourite troubadour produces another album of straight up singer-songwriter gems documenting his travels around the world.

Lankum
23. LankumBetween The Earth & Sky
Lankum, the band formally known as Lynched, are producing some of the most raw traditional Irish music going around, complete with the thickest Dublin accent you’re likely to hear this year.

Old Crow Medicine Show
24. Old Crow Medicine Show50 Years Of Blonde On Blonde
Old Crow Medicine Show pay homage to Dylan with this live stringband version of the classic Blonde On Blonde

Johnny Flynn
25. Johnny FlynnSillion
An absolute gem of an album that sees Johnny Flynn’s distinctive voice and resonator front and centre, but a willingness to play with production a bit more than previous releases, adding more texture and nuance to each of the tracks.

Riverboats Music Festival Announces 2018 Lineup

Riverboats
Image Courtesy of Riverboats Music Festival

The Murray River’s annual celebrations of live music, the Riverboats Music Festival, has just announced its 2018 lineup and Timber and Steel fans have so much to look forward to.

The headliners next year will be none other then Neil & Liam Finn, Kasey Chambers and Josh Pyke.

Joining them will be The Black Sorrows with Vika & Linda Bull, The Teskey Brothers, Henry Wagons & The Only Children, Gawurra, Mojo Juju, Neil Murray, Caiti Baker, Jazz Party, Tracy McNeil & The GoodLife and Eaten By Dogs.

Riverboats 2018 will present arguably the festival’s most eclectic and exciting lineup to date,” Festival Director David Frazer said. “It’s been a dream of ours to welcome Neil and Liam Finn to Riverboats for many years, and to be presenting these phenomenal artists alongside Australian icons including Kasey Chambers and Josh Pyke. is something we’re incredibly proud of.”

The Riverboats Music Festival takes place in the twin-towns of Echuca-Moama, two and a half hours north of Melbourne, from the 16th to the 18th February. For more information including how to get your hands on tickets check out the official web site here.

Review: First Annual Australian Americana Honours Night

Americana Honours
Image Courtesy of the Americana Music Association

Australian Americana Honours Night feat. Old Crow Medicine Show, Valerie June, Kevin Welch, Busby Marou, Kasey Chambers, Shane Howard, Yirrmal, Bernard Fanning, Catherine Britt, Henry Wagons, Emily Barker, Ruby Boots, Jordie Lane & The Sleepers
Thornbury Theatre, Melbourne, VIC
Monday 2nd October, 2017

Like many people I woke up Tuesday morning to the horrible news that an evil individual had killed dozens and injured hundreds of people in a mass shooting in Las Vegas. What’s really hit home about this latest atrocity is that it was committed at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival – a festival not unlike the festivals the Timber and Steel community attends all the time here in Australia. Words cannot describe the emotions I’m feeling right now. It’s senseless, just senseless.

As the events in Vegas were unfolding on Monday night night I was sitting in the warm confines of Melbourne’s Thornbury Theatre for the first annual Australian Americana Honours Night. It was a coming together of the Australian Americana community and a celebration of a genre that has so much heart and soul behind it. As so often happens with these events I was overwhelmed with the community that’s been created around the music we love.

From the opening marching-band entrance of Old Crow Medicine Show’s live version of “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” to the closing singalong of “May The Circle Be Unbroken” featuring Old Crow, Valerie June, Kasey Chambers and Kevin Welch, the Australian Americana Honours Night was pure joy from start to finish.

Americana Honours

It would be too easy to look at the events in Vegas and decide that you’re not going to music festivals anymore. Despite how irrational it is, despite the fact that hundreds, if not thousands of festivals are held around the world every year without incident, it would be easy to walk away from live music.

If it wasn’t for the Australian Americana Honours Night last night maybe I would have made the easy decision and walked away from live music festivals. At the very least maybe I would’ve reconsidered my bucket list of international festivals, striking all off the US-based events.

But when you’re listening to Kasey Chambers and Bernard Fanning duet on “Watch Over Me”, when you can feel the goosebumps from Yirrmal’s surprise performance with Shane Howard, when Henry Wagons literally owns the entire stage while performing “King Hit”, when artists you’ve been following and supporting for years like Ruby Boots, Emily Barker, Catherine Britt, Jordie Lane and Busby Marou get roaring applause from the gathered fans and industry folk, you know there’s no way you can give this up.

Americana Honours

Kasey Chambers and Brian “BT” Taranto were both honoured with vanguard awards on the night and both of them gave passionate speeches about how important Americana music is. How much the community means. To me it was almost a call to arms – a plea to keep the candle burning for good music. To keep going to festivals, to gigs, to keep buying records and to keep the passion alive.

When I woke up Tuesday morning, before I turned to my smart phone, before I knew the full extent of what had happened in Las Vegas, I was still buzzing from the Australian Americana Honours Night, and the 3+ hours of amazing music I’d witnessed the night before. And even as the world came crashing down around me as I scrolled through the news it wasn’t enough to extinguish the light that is burning for live music.

The best way to not let the bastards win? Keep going to live music. Keep going to festivals. Show your support, be part of the community of amazing people who keep this music alive, and enjoy every minute of it.

Thank you Australian Americana Honours.

Details of the First Annual Australian Americana Honours Night in Melbourne

Australian Amerciana Honours
Image Courtesy of the Americana Music Association

Americana fans rejoice – Australia is about to get it’s very own Americana Honours Night this October.

The inaugural Australian Americana Honours Night will take place in Melbourne at the Thornbury Theatre on Monday 2nd October. The event is being presented by Michael Chugg, Nash Chambers and the international Americana Music Association and will celebrate the diverse artists that make up the Australian Americana scene.

The Australian Americana Honours Night will feature a raft of performers including international icons Old Crow Medicine Show, Valerie June and Kevin Welch along with Australian favourites Busby Marou, Kasey Chambers, Shane Howard, Bernard Fanning, Catherine Britt, Henry Wagons, Emily Barker, Ruby Boots and Jordie Lane & The Sleepers.

During the night the Americana Music Association will present the inaugural Americana Vanguard Awards to Kasey Chambers for her deep commitment to roots music and to Brian “BT” Taranto, founder of the Out on the Weekend festival, who has been championing the Americana Community for more than a decade.

“For those of us who love roots and Americana Music, this is a dream line-up to have at our inaugural event,” Nash Chambers explained. “We’re mighty proud to be building awareness of Americana Music in Australia with the US Association and Tennessee Tourism. We also believe this is just the beginning of a genre that is exploding worldwide.”

For more information on the night including how to get your hands on tickets head over to Chugg Entertainment here.

The Wingham Akoostik Festival Announces 2017 Lineup

Russell Morris
Image Courtesy of Russell Morris

Every October the small town of Wingham on the NSW mid north coast comes alive with some amazing folk and acoustic music for the Wingham Akoostik Festival.

The lineup for this year’s Wingham Akoostik Festival has just dropped and it’s absolutely huge with artists from around the country (and around the world) representing. The festival will be headlined by country legend Kasey Chambers, multiple-ARIA award winning roots artist Russell Morris and Killing Heidi front-woman Ella Hooper. These guys will be joined by the likes of The Turner Brown Band, Eagle & The Wolf, Sara Tindley, Colin Lillie, Matt Joe Gow and many many more.

The Wingham Akoostik Festival is held on Friday 13th to Sunday 15th October – for more information check out the official site here. The full lineup is below:

Kasey Chambers, Russell Morris, Eurogliders, Ella Hooper, The Turner Brown Band, Eagle & The Wolf, The Kava Kings, Glen Mead Band, Harry’s Lookout, The Trapps, Riley Phillips, Twin Peaks, Minnie Marks, Bad Pon, James Bennett, Sara Tindley, Ralway Bell, Colin Lillie, Matt Joe Gow, Roy Rose, D’Boyzos, James Van Cooper, Sam Hasty, Scott Darlow, Jake Davey, Hillbilly Hoppers, The Travelling Teardrops, Soar, L’Wren, Waang Djarii Dancers, Josh Needs, Lexi Jade, Wingsong, Reece Lalor

Ten Albums and EPs From the First Half of 2017 You Should Own

Records

Can you believe we’re more than halfway through 2017? What a crazy year it’s been so far – and what a year of music we’ve had!

For us at here at Timber and Steel 2017 has been a lot about reconnecting with new music from the amazing folk artists who first inspired us to start writing about this music, as well as the debut albums from a bunch of artists that we’ve been patiently waiting to release music for what feels like years.

So we thought we’d continue our tradition of the last couple of years to highlight ten albums and EPs we think should be part of your collection – as well as tell you exactly what it is about these records that we love.

So without further ado here’s our Ten Albums and EPs From the First Half of 2017 You Should Own:

When We FallAll Our Exes Live In Texas

AOELIT
Watching All Our Exes Live In Texas transform from a one-off coming together of Sydney singer-songwriters a few years ago to the musical powerhouse they are today has been just a joy. When their debut album When We Fall dropped this year fans were rewarded with some fine fine songwriting, pitch perfect production and a true celebration of the four part harmony. Despite the disparate styles of each member’s solo work, When We Fall is a beautiful, cohesive album that demands to be listened to over and over again.

Cover My TracksCharlie Fink

Charlie Fink
Noah and The Whale’s 2009 concept album The First Days of Spring is easily one of my favourite releases of the last 10 years. Its sprawling dissection of frontman Charlie Fink’s break up with Laura Marling is a true masterpiece. So when Fink’s promo around his new solo album Cover My Tracks likened it as an unofficial sequel to The First Days of Spring I was more than a little skeptical, especially given the Springsteen-light pop direction Noah and The Whale took in its final years. But the truth is that Cover My Tracks delivers. It still doesn’t hold a candle to The First Days of Spring but Charlie Fink has captured some of his early magic with his solo album. The release is another concept album (which also comes accompanied by a play written by David Greig) and it deserves to be listened to from start to finish. It’s great to have Charlie Fink back doing what he does best.

Sweet Kind of BlueEmily Barker

Emily Barker
I was lucky enough to see Emily Barker at a super intimate show in Melbourne back in April, just as she was about to release Sweet Kind of Blue. Watching Barker on stage with just herself, her guitar and an accompanying double bass just solidified how good she is as a songwriter – when you strip back the production of Sweet Kind of Blue there’s still something amazing at the core. She deftly combines country, blues and folk styles, harkening back to a tradition while still producing a sound that is fresh and engaging. It’s about time Australia started paying more attention to Emily Barker, esepcially if she keeps producing music like Sweet Kind of Blue.

Crack-UpFleet Foxes

Fleet Foxes
Following a six-year break Fleet Foxes return with their very special brand of 70’s folk nostalgia on Crack-Up. Robin Pecknold and co’s harmonic, sweet vocals over Fleet Foxes’ epic, rhythmic melodies have been sorely missed and it’s great to see them balancing the nostalgia of their earlier work with their need to grow artistically. Despite the off-putting opening track “I Am All That I Need/Arroyo Seco/Thumbprint Scar” Crack-Up is a solid album that can stand proudly next to Helplessness Blues and their self titled debut. Let’s hope we don’t have to wait another six years for album number four.

SillionJohnny Flynn

Johnny Flynn
The return of Johnny Flynn to folk-singing this year came as a bit of surprise given his recent focus on his screen and stage acting career (if you haven’t seen Lovesick on Netflix we can recommend giving it a crack). But we’re so glad Flynn’s picked up the resonator again because Sillion is an absolute gem of an album. Johnny Flynn’s distinctive voice is once again front and centre on the album but he seems to be playing with the production a bit more, adding more texture and nuance to each of the tracks. I don’t know if this is the start of a new direction for Johnny Flynn – if it is I’m interested to see where he goes next.

DragonflyKasey Chambers

Kasey Chambers
There are two big things that excited me about Kasey Chambers’ new album Dragonfly. Firstly the fact that the double album had two different producers – Paul Kelly and Nash Chambers respectively – giving each disc a distinct sound. And secondly the raft of collaborations with really interesting artists such as Vika & Linda Bull, Keith Urban, Paul Kelly, Foy Vance, Harry Hookey, Ed Sheeran and Grizzlee Train – many of those, you’d agree, wouldn’t normally be associated with Kasey Chambers’ music. The result is one of Kasey Chambers’ most interesting and dare we say best albums to date.

Semper FeminaLaura Marling

Laura Marling
Laura Marling has gone deep on her exploration of the feminine in her brand new album Semper Femina and I love it. It was really interesting watching Marling explore feminine creativity in her podcast series Reversal of the Muse earlier this year and Semper Femina seems to be the artistic extension of the conversations she was having with the likes of Marika Hackman, Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris. The album is yet another example of Laura Marling’s skills as a songwriter, guitarist and singer – each song is perfectly crafted. Laura Marling truly is one of the greatest artists of our generation.

The Ahern BrothersThe Ahern Brothers

The Ahern Brothers
The Ahern Brothers is the perfect coupling of singer-songwriters Josh Rennie-Hynes and Steve Grady, bringing two-part male harmony singing in the vein of The Everly Brothers, Simon & Garfunkel and more recently The Milk Carton Kids to an Australian audience. Their self-titled debut album is a pure delight and elevates everything we’ve heard from Rennie-Hynes and Grady individually to date. I have a sneaking suspicion this album is going to make it onto a lot of people’s best of end of year lists. Beautiful.

The MorrisonsThe Morrisons

The Morrisons
We’ve already said plenty about The Morrisons’ long awaited self-titled debut album but there was no way it was going to get left off this list. The Morrisons are easily one of Australia’s best bluegrass and alt-country bands, it’s just a pity it takes them so long to get a record in stores. The Morrisons is an album of quintessentially Australian songs set to the familiar chop of a quintessentially American musical style. And it doesn’t hurt that individually each of The Morrisons is a master of their respective instrument making the album as technically brilliant as it is artistically brilliant. Now what do we have to do to get The Morrisons back in the studio for a followup?

BloomTimothy James Bowen

Timothy James Bowen
If you’ve been following Timothy James Bowen’s story over the last couple of years you’ll know it’s not been an easy journey for the singer songwriter. Diagnosed with Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma (a type of blood cancer), Bowen spent much of 2016 in treatment before going into remission. Bloom bookends this massive upheaval in his life, but it also shows how a songwriter of Timothy James Bowen’s talent is able to channel his experience into his art. Even without the personal context Bloom is an amazing EP – here are five incredible songs from a master songwriter.

And of course special mention also has to go to so many other albums and EPs that were released in the first six months of 2017 including (but not limited to):

VacancyBroads
Postcards From The Shell HouseBusby Marou
All You Need Is MusicDavidson Brothers
÷Ed Sheeran
PunchbuzzHusky
The Nashville SoundJason Isbell & The 400 Unit
UnchartedJoel Barker & The Low Company
Jordan Ireland With Purple OrchestraJordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra
Barefoot WonderlandJustin Bernasconi
Universal FavoriteNoam Pikelny
50 Years Of Blonde On BlondeOld Crow Medicine Show
Good Days, These DaysQuinton Trembath
Freedom HighwayRhiannon Giddens
The WaterSam Buckingham
PlanetariumSufjan Stevens, Nico Muhly, Bryce Dessner, James McAlister
CyclingTaryn La Fauci
Take Care Take CoverThe Mae Trio
IronbarkThe Waifs
A Fair WindTrioc

Bluesfest Review: Monday Monday

St Paul & the Broken Bones at Bluesfest. Photos by Stuart Bucknell Photography

It’s the final day of Bluesfest and emotions are a mixed bag of excitement for what ahead, sadness that it’s ending and a bit of relief from the continual stimulation and inspiration from so many amazing artists.

We have to see Blind Boy Paxton again after last year’s show, so we’re here at 1:30pm at the Delta stage as Paxton starts on the keyboard with a sound sentimental to the golden age of Hollywood, a delightful dash of honky tonk and and old times blues sensation. With a dextrous trill of the keys, he has us all enthralled. Paxton says he’s starting off easy “as you all partied to hardy at the festival” last night, and we all laugh, evidence of how he easily builds rapport with the crowd with delightfully timed jokes and comments. He quips “Y’all let me sit off centre [of the stage] and not tell me. Is there anything on my face!?” and breaks in to a huge grin, we chuckle and settle in to enjoy his acoustic guitar dripping in old time blues. The twinkle of his eye matches the twinkle of the guitar strings before he pulls out the harmonica for a spirited performance with rhythm sticks, which keep the momentum going as he sings the refrains.

As fans of early 2000s rockers, Jet, we thought we’d better check in at Crossroads stage to see where the band’s Nic Chester is at these days, and for a 2:15pm chill out, we’re not disappointed. A delicious blend of indie rock and blues soaked riffs greets. His signature vocals hammer home his comfort and familiarity on stage, bringing the crowd in to the fold of his stories.

At 3pm we wander to the Jambalaya stage for Tony Joe White and the crowd erupts in applause as the legend takes to the stage. It seems appropriate at Easter to have a voice as deep and smooth as chocolate smother you in blues, and we all revel in its seductive tones. White rumbles along like percolating coffee, earthy, enticing and altogether satisfying with tones and tales.

After yesterday’s teaser, we decide to head to Delta stage at 4:30pm to see more of Lloyd Spiegel than a passing glimpse. It’s clear pretty quickly that Spiegel is a tongue in cheek wit as he jests that he “might as well tune my guitar on stage” before showing off fingers moving so fast there we half expect to see smoke rising from the fast finger friction! Clearly this set should have come with a warning sign! Amazing sounds stream out of one guitar, the likes equivalent of multiple guitars, and a stomp box the stamp out a hectic beat. Just as we think it’s reached it’s peak, Spiegel unleashes a laconic voice that dances with his guitar string. Ever the comedian, stories are told between songs making us all laugh. Did you know “the Queen thinks he world smells like fresh paint? Because everywhere she goes has been freshly painted!” And blues isn’t safe as he declares “Jeff Lang has never seen a guitarist play to their full capacity because they all shit themselves when he walks in!” His infectious sense of humour has the crowd in stitches and his ferocious fret work has us all in awe. If you want a real laugh, ask his about the guy who “won” the guitar in the raffle – the story is a corker!

As 5pm rolls around we dash to see St Paul & The Broken Bones at the Mojo stage. Their set flawed us last year and this year they’re up there as a must see! With a pre-recorded intro like something out of old Hollywood, but overtaken by old soul, the melody acts like siren song luring people in to join the crowds eagerly anticipating their show. After their 2016 roustabout style performance, this year they deliver a much more soulful and serene performance. The crowds are absorbed, transfixed and transported to another time through the multilayer musings, the sultry, emotive dalliances, and the standing ovation inspiring instrumentals. As we’re all lulled in to their rhythm, they segue in to an upbeat and energetic full band piece laden with funk, just to wake up all of our senses and have us all moving to the beat!

Noticing a name we recognise, Ashleigh Mannix, as part of the folk-grunge duo line up for Little Georgia, we head to Juke Joint to catch their 6pm set. We’re greeted with “This Old House” in sublime harmonised vocals and one-two combination of an acoustic and an electric guitar working together like the best sweet and sour you’ve ever tasted. Delivering an electrified indie vibe with a side of dirty grunge, the duo still trips lightly along the line between acoustic sensibilities and a fully electric sound. The instruments sonically dance together rather than battling for supremacy and a gutsy, punchy opening cements them within the minds of the crowd. Mannix’s vocals offer a depth of tone and nuance, highlighted by Carter’s higher pitched twang. Together they have an intimacy on stage that connects the two yet invites the crowd in to fully experience the counterpoints of lyrical progression. As they both switch to acoustic guitars, the difference has a significant change to their sound and vibe creating a very upbeat and organic sound. Their set wanders deeply in to the folk and indie realms, revels in its joyousness, crosses in to mournful lament, a sentimental melancholy with the sweetest treatment musically, and dives back in to the grunge element seamlessly. Definitely an act to keep an eye on!

We decide to venture to the Craft Beer Bar and grab a stool out the front to catch some of Kasey Chambers‘ 6:45pm set at Crossroads stage. She has everyone singing, even the guy in the crowd sporting a full beard and passionate rendition of “Not Pretty Enough”. Chambers charms the crowd with her deliciously harmonised songs where country meets blues and spell binding rendition of crowd favourites.

Since it’s the last night, and we saw Sir Rosevelt the other night, we figure we should go and catch Zac Brown Band at 8:15pm on the Mojo stage. Our first reaction? “Holy shit!” That rumbling guitar opening and a whole bunch of country style toe tapping, hand clapping, clear plucking, good-time hoe-down style cacophony hits us like a wave, picking us up and taking us on a wild ride. There is wild fiddle tearing the house down with an electric boost smashing “Whiskey’s Gone” in to the ether. Lead singer Brown has the crowd in palm of hand, we’re cheering at the intro and singing along in a heartbeat, whether we know the words or not. A full spectrum performance where we traverse the upbeat, the solemn, the optimistic, heartfelt and the lamentful touch points of life. And to top it off, for the second time this festival, we are treated to a spirited cover of Bohemian Rhapsody.

To finish the night, and bring our festival to an end, we swing by the Delta stage at 9pm to witness The Record Company. Reminiscent of Ash Grunwald’s vigor with harmonica, distorted mic but with a kicking bass guitar and hefty drums backing up. As a delectable counterpoint, the fine harmonica trills are the main instrument when lead singer Vos is not singing. A powerful rock crescendo to finish our Bluesfest experience.

If you think you’d like to head to Bluesfest 2018, early bird tickets are now available to buy at heavily discounted prices. Essentially, every time we’ve ever been, it’s guaranteed a great line up and festival. If you’ve never been, do what you can to make it one year!

Trip back over our full weekend at Bluesfest:

5 Things We Learned at Bluesfest 2017
Bluesfest Review: Good Friday is a fine day!
Bluesfest Review: Saturday Celebration
Bluesfest Review: Sweet Sunday

Head to our Facebook Page to see our full collection of photos from the festival

Highlights from Monday at Bluesfest

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Bluesfest Review: 5 things we learned at Bluesfest 2017

Vintage TroubleVintage Trouble at Bluesfest, by Stuart Bucknell Photography

Before we give you our full wrap up, here’s 5 things we learned at Bluesfest this year:

1 – Byron Bay Organic Doughnuts are still THE most popular food item at the festival
It seems trivial, but food at festivals is a huge part of the experience, and ever since we’ve been going to Bluesfest, the Byron Bay Organic Doughnut stand has always had enormous queues. Our advice? Definitely get at least one, but get in the line any time you see that it’s short – no matter if it’s early in the day. #treatyourself!
NB: It turns out they’ve experienced heavy losses due to the floods, to we’re sending all the sugary vibes their way to be able to bounce back soon!

2 – Powerhouse Performances Guaranteed
I said it last year and I’ll say it again. Peter Noble knows how to program. Some of the most notable powerhouse performances to hit the Bluesfest stages this year were the electrifying Nikki Hill who blew the socks off everyone and had them clamoring for more, more, more; Kasey Chambers whose stellar set ranged through her back catalogue and her recent works, with everyone watching on proving they were in fine voice – when you’ve got a bearded man singing along word for word to “Am I Not Pretty Enough”, you know you’re on to a winner; Beth Hart stole hearts and minds both in her sass filled set and with her cameo with Soul legends, Vintage Trouble. Hart’s prowess and her effortlessly smooth transitions from full band, to solemn brevity on a solo piano piece, to funky piano riffs and soul soaked blues had her a firm favourite in the hearts of Bluesfest.

3 – Legends Never Die
Ok, so some actually do, and it’s sad when we lose a musical talent that has helped shape what we know and love, but the great thing about Bluesfest is the ability to bring out absolute legends who may be advanced in years but still have enough swagger to floor multiple thousands of people at once, just like 80 year old Buddy Guy did on the Sunday at the Crossroads stage, resplendent in polka dots and serving up a voice that shackled the high notes yet melted all the way down through every blues note to the bottom, playing guitar with his elbow, or his belt buckle, or it seems with his just his sheer personality. Mud Morganfield had the crowd entranced with the whim of his jive and old school blues sensibilities. And Mavis Staples blew the roof off the Jambalaya stage when her elegance and grace meshed with the most divine harmonies between herself and her backing singers. Staples spoke of her love for Bluesfest – the warmth and hospitality they receive from the people behind the scenes, acknowledging them as family. She declared that she came “to bring you some joy, some happiness, some inspiration” and that she did. Given it was Easter, it seemed only appropriate that a voice as deep and smooth as chocolate can smother you in blues, as Tony Joe White’s did, rumbling along like a percolated coffee – earthy, enticing, and altogether satisfying.

4 – Diversity in Styles and Causes
Bluesfest may boast the best line up of Blues, however, it’s steadfast reputation for quality means the door is open for Noble to select an eclectic mix of styles and genres that may be close to, derived from, or inspired by blues music. Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue carved up the stage with their cataclysmic, high energy, RnB fuelled, jazz infused funk; Sir Roosevelt’s moody intro and high production values set the scene for the melding of acoustic and dance music –  slide and acoustic guitars accompanied a full club scene vibe complete with choreographed dancers! Madness whipped the crowd, both young and old, in to a frenzy with hit after hit. The Boomerang Festival with it’s astounding array of Indigenous performances, country style hoedowns with an electrifying edge, synths vs electric guitars, Hip Hop and RnB, ukeleles and two covers of Bohemian Rhapsody… This year’s Bluesfest had everything. The festival is also a solid community supporter, with multiple fundraising groups on site, drumming up support for their cause. It was heartening to see the Northern Rivers Flood Appeal, a devestating disaster only weeks before the festival, included at short notice int he fundraising efforst at the festival, alongside the famous Cyctic Fibrosis Raffle and the steadfast Playing For Change band.

5 – The Gender Gap Exists
In no way was Bluesfest deficient in amazing female performers, in fact, it feels that year after year, the festival selects some of the best and most inspiring women from around the world to grace the stage. However, these women are almost exclusively front women, women who are the main attraction with a band behind them. Time and time again, we saw bands of all males, whether a backing band or a feature act – if it was a group, it was a high likelihood that the members would all be male. While there were a few exceptions, like Mavis Staples’ fantastic backing singers and the inimitable Little Georgia, the prevalence of all male bands and groups was quite noticeable, especially after the ongoing social commentary about the issue across the music industry of late and with festival and gig line-ups being scruitinised and questioned regularly by the public. While it’s no fault of the Bluesfest team, it is proof of the endemic issue across the music industry which hopefully the inclusive nature of festivals like this can start to shift through leadership and discourse, and innovations like the Buskers stage and the nurturing nature of this festival itself. We want to see more gender diversity across all aspects of music – not just front women, but musicians in bands of all gender identities. I know it will be festivals like Bluesfest that lead the way as a much needed change begins.

All in all, Bluesfest left it’s mark on the 100,000+ strong crowds and we’re still dreaming about the amazing musicians we saw. Our full wrap up coming soon, in the meantime, check out the photos by Stuart Bucknell Photography on our Timber and Steel Facebook Page, and if you’re keen to experience Bluesfest yourself, get in line for an early bird ticket to next year’s festival!

 

 

 

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 13th January

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

– Indie folk duo Husky released their new video “Late Night Store”. Details here

– Sydney summer concert series Courtyard Sessions announced their 2017 lineup including Imogen Clark, Leroy Lee, Jordie Lane, Taryn La Fauci, Skyscraper Stan, The Cruisin’ Deuces and more. Details here

– Sahara Beck released her new single “Crack Bang Bang”. Details here

– Ex-member of The Middle East Jordan Ireland announced his new album Jordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra and beautiful new single “East Coaster”. Details here

– Singer-songwriter Jack Carty announced a tour through February, March and April. Details here

William Crighton released his new video “Jesus Blues”. Details here

– Indie-folk duo The Campervan Dancers released their new video “St⭐️rlight (Pickin’ Pears)”. Details here

– Canadian folk and trad trio The East Pointers have announced a massive Australian tour kicking off in March. Details here

– We posted the latest video from bluegrass duo The Weeping Willows, “Fallen Ring”. Details here

– Australia’s queen of country Kasey Chambers announced her new double album Dragonfly. Details here

– Melbourne singer-songwriter Kathleen Mary Lee released her video “Hey, Very Good Friend”. Details here

– Australian tour dates were announced for Billy Bragg and Joe Henry. Details here

Blog

With the new year upon us it’s time to look ahead at some of the great folk, roots and acoustic music that will be coming our way in 2017. We had a stab at picking 10 artists we think you should be keeping an eye on in the coming months including All Our Exes Live in Texas, Davidson Brothers, Fleet Foxes, Husky, Jordan Ireland, Laura Marling, Punch Brothers, Rhiannon Giddens, The Morrisons and Timberwolf. Blog here

Releases This Week

Flo Morrissey
Gentlewoman, Ruby ManFlo Morrissey & Matthew E. White
iTunes

Laws of Gravity
Laws of GravityThe Infamous Stringdusters
iTunes

The McClymonts
EndlessThe McClymonts
iTunes

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Illawarra Folk Festival

Illawarra FF

Our favourite mid size folk festival kicks off this weekend with an amazing lineup including Andy Irvine and Luke Plumb, FourWinds, Tattletale Saints, The Whitetop Mountaineers, Tim O’Brien, Wallis Bird, Daniel Champagne, Echo Deer, Handsome Young Strangers, Lime and Steel, Mandy Connell, Martin Pearson, Nigel Wearne, Shanty Club, The Squeezebox Trio, Tinpan Orange, Big Erle, Jane Aubourg, Joe Mungovan, Kay Proudlove, Shelley’s Murder Boys, The Lurkers and many many more.

Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Bulli, NSW

Gigs Next Week

Áine Tyrrell
Friday 13th January – Rosny Barn, TAS
Saturday 14th January – Waratah Hotel, Hobart, TAS
Friday 20th January – The Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC

Alanna and Alicia
Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW

Alice Terry
Thursday 19 January – Village Stage, Meriton Festival Village, Sydney, NSW

Andy Irvine w/ Luke Plumb
Friday 13th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW
Thursday 19th January – Bathurst City Community Club, Bathurst, NSW
Friday 20th January – Fairlight Folk Acoustic Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Backsliders w/ Shelly’s Murder Boys
Saturday 14th January – Milton Theatre, Milton, NSW

Banjo Jackson
Thursday 19th January – Hither & Yon, Willunga, SA

Ben Salter
Thursday 19th January – The Golden Barley, Sydney, NSW

Blue King Brown
Friday 13th January – Mona Vale Hotel, Mona Vale, NSW

Bluegrass @ Yulli’s Bluegrass Picnic
Wenesday 18th January – Balls Head Reserve, Sydney, NSW

Broads
Sunday 15th January – The Golden Barley, Sydney, NSW

Cash Savage & The Last Drinks
Wednesday 18th January – Magic Mirrors Spiegeltent, Sydney, NSW

Courtyard Sessions Presents Imogen Clark
Friday 13th January – Seymour Centre, Sydney, NSW

Courtyard Sessions Presents Leroy Lee
Friday 20th January – Seymour Centre, Sydney, NSW

Don McGlashan
Friday 13th January – Brookfields Shed, Margate, TAS
Saturday 20th January – The Wheatsheaf, Adelaide, SA
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Mofo, Mona Foma, Hobart, TAS

eüsh, Nic Cassey & Friends
Thursday 19th January – Marlborough Hotel, Sydney, NSW

Fairlight Folk feat. Andy Irvine & Luke Plumb, Seanchas
Friday 20th January – Fairlight Folk Acoustic Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Fanny Lumsden
Friday 20th January – Fanzone Performance, Tamworth, NSW

FolkSwagon feat. GG Music, Ben Camden, Julia Johnson
Wednesday 18th January – Cafe Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Fourwinds
Wednesday 11th to Sunday 15th January – Illawara Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Tuesday 17th January – Wauchope Arts Hall, Wauchope, NSW
Wednesday 18th January – 5 Church Street, Bellingen, NSW
Friday 20th January – The Unorthodox Church of Groove, Newcastle, NSW

George & Noriko
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW

Gregory Page
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW

Handsome Young Strangers
Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Friday 20th January – Botany View Hotel, Sydney, NSW

Hat Fitz & Cara
Thursday 19th January – Lizottes, Newcastle, NSW
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Thredbo Blues Festival, Thredbo, NSW

High and Lonesome feat. Katie Crane, Scott Collins, John Woolhouse
Saturday 14th January – The Bellingen Brewery & Co., Bellingen, NSW

Hinterlandt
Thursday 19th January – Alpha House Artist Co, Sydney, NSW
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Mofo, Mona Foma, Hobart, TAS

HONK! Oz
Thursday 19th to Saturday 21st January – Wollongong, NSW

Hootenanny feat. Mark Lucas and The Dead Setters
Sunday 15th January – Miss Peaches, Sydney, NSW

Illawarra Folk Festival
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Bulli, NSW

Jenny Biddle
Thursday 19th January – The Basement, Sydney, NSW

Joe & Harmony’s Trippy Hippy Band
Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW

Josh Pyke & Bob Evans
Friday 13th January – Esk BeerFest, Launceston, TAS

Kenta Hayashi
Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Wednesday 18th January – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT
Friday 20th January – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, NSW

King Arthur
Thursday 19th January – The Rooks Return, Melbourne, VIC

Kirsty Bromley
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW

Kyle Taylor
Friday 13th January – The Wheatsheaf, Adelaide, SA
Saturday 14th January – The Exeter, Adelaide, SA

Lake Street Dive
Friday 13th January – Sydney Festival, Sydney, NSW

Lime & Steel
Wednesday 11th to Sunday 15th January – Illawara Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW

MANE
Sunday 15th January – Hither & Yon, Willunga, SA

Matt Henry
Thursday 19th January – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

Matt J Ward & The Rising Sons w/ Alana Jagt, Sam Newton
Sunday 15th January – The Wheatsheaf, Adelaide, SA

Melody Moko, The Wayward Henrys & Andrew Swift
Thursday 19th January – The Stag & Hunter, Newcastle, NSW

Missy Higgins
Sunday 15th January – Australian Open Sessions, Melbourne, VIC

Mofo
Friday 20th to Sunday 21st January – Mona Foma, Hobart, TAS

Nigel Wearne
Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Friday 20th January – Mountain Mumma, Sheffield, TAS

Numeralla Folk Festival
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Numberalla, NSW

Passenger
Friday 20th January – Riverstage Theatre, Brisbane, QLD

Pierce Brothers
Friday 13th January – The Grand, Morngington, VIC
Saturday 14th January – Westernport Hotel, San Remo, VIC
Thursday 19th January – Newtown Social Club, Sydney, NSW
Friday 20th January – The Foundry, Brisbane, QLD

Roesy
Saturday 14th January – Salt Contemporary Art Gallery, Queenscliff, VIC
Sunday 15th January – Long Play, Melbourne, VIC

Sahara Beck
Friday 13th January – The Rhythm Hut, Gosford, NSW

Sharon Shannon
Friday 13th January – Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh, VIC
Saturday 14th January – Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC
Sunday 15th January – Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC

Shelley’s Murder Boys
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW
Saturday 14th January – Milton Theatre, Milton, NSW
Thursday 19th January – Mr Falcon’s, Sydney, NSW

Tamar Valley Folk Festival
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Georgetown, TAS

Tamworth Country Music Festival
Friday 20th to Sunday 29th January – Tamworth, NSW

Tattletale Saints
Friday 13th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW

The Outside Track
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, NSW

The Porch Sessions On Tour feat. Stu Larsen, Luke Thompson, Tim Moore
Friday 13th January – Melbourne, VIC
Sunday 15th January – Bacchus Marsh, VIC
Wednesday 18th January – Wollongong, NSW
Friday 20th January – Sydney (Croydon Park), NSW

The Snakemen
Sunday 19th January – Wayward Brewing Company, Sydney, NSW

The Weeping Willows
Sunday 15th January – The Standard Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

The Whitetop Mountaineers
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Wednesday 18th January – Yinnar Community Hall, Yinnar, VIC
Thursday 19th January – Valencia Creek Hall, Brigalong, VIC
Friday 20th January – Harvester Moon Café, Bellarine, VIC

Thompson Springs w/ Maia Marsh
Friday 13th January – The Front, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 15th January – Retreat Hotel, Melbourne, VIC
Monday 16th January – Cherry Bar, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 17th January – Some Velvet Morning, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 20th January – Club 54, Launceston, TAS

Thredbo Blues Festival
Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd January – Thredbo, NSW

Tim O’Brien
Friday 13th to Saturday 14th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Sunday 15th January – The Quarter Deck, Narooma, NSW
Thursday 19th January – The Petersham Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW

TinPan Orange
Saturday 14th and Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW

Vanishing Shapes
Sunday 15th January – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD
Monday 16th January – Camp Davey, Lismore, NSW
Wednesday 18th January – Phoenix Rising Café, Nimbin, NSW
Thursday 19th January – Treehouse on Belongil, Byron Bay, NSW
Friday 20th January – Miami Marketta, Gold Coast, QLD

Wallis Bird
Friday 13th and Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW

We Lost the Sea w/ The Crooked Fiddle Band
Saturday 14th January – Northcote Social Club, Sydney, NSW

William Crighton
Saturday 14th January – Quarterdeck, Narooma, NSW

Winter Wilson
Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January – Illawarra Folk Festival, Bulli, NSW
Thursday 19th January – Braidwood Folk Club, Braidwood, NSW
Friday 20th January – Humph Hall, Sydney, NSW

Friday Folk Flashback

“The Bonny Ship, The Diamond” – Beoga

English superstar Ed Sheeran dropped details of his upcoming album ÷. The album will include collaborations with Irish trad band Beoga so we think it’s time you got acquainted.

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