The Summer Hill Folk Festival Announces Lineup for 2018

Summer Hill FF
Image Courtesy of Summer Hill Filk Festival

For the past couple of years a simply delightful folk festival has sprung up in the sleepy Sydney suburb of Summer Hill and it’s quickly flourished to become one of our favourite events of the year.

The Summer Hill Folk Festival is centered around the historic Summer Hill Church and features a full day of music, workshops, markers and more. This year’s event is set to take place on Saturday 10th March and features a fine lineup of amazing local folk artists (and Timber and Steel favourites) including Chaika, eüsh, Giffen, Gary & Jimmy Daley, Montgomery Church, Nic Cassey, Queen Porter Stomp, The Restless Legs, Roaring Forties, Summer Hill Community Choir, Tangalo Duo, Whoa Mule and more.

This year the Summer Hill Folk Festival will also host a blackboard stage giving anyone the opportunity to sign up and perform for 30 mins as well as vocal and dance workshops and an Irish Ceili Dance.

The Summer Hill Folk Festival is a free community event. For more details check out the official Facebook event here.

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 3rd April

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

– Canadian fiddler April Verch released her new video “Belle Election”. Details here

Passenger announced his new album Whispers II. Details here

Bellowhead released their new video “Roll Alabama”. Details here

– US duo The Milk Carton Kids announced details of their new album Monterey. Details here

Dan Managan + Blacksmith released their new video “Mouthpiece”. Details here

– Melbourne singers Fraser A Gorman and Leah Senior released a version of “Blues Run The Game”. Details here

– Sydney artists Direwolf and Willowy announced a co-headline east coast tour. Details here

– The inaugural Bello Winter Music Festival announced its lineup including The Milk Carton Kids, Ash Grunwald, TinPan Orange, Marlon Williams, The Wilson Pickers, Lucie Thorne & Hamish Stuart, Perch Creek, Jack Carty, Karl S Williams, The Mid North, The Button Collective, Starboard Cannons, Sara Tindley, Oh Pep! and many many more. Details here

Vance Joy released his new video “Georgia”. Details here

– UK based chamber-folk band The Leisure Society released their new single “The Fine Art of Hanging On”. Details here

– Adelaide’s Thom Lion & The Tamers have released their new single “Emily”. Details here

Interviews

“We’ve never been on the [National Folk Festival] program before but we have actually played a couple of times as part of the MoFo concert or The Flute & Fiddle asked us to play. We always love doing a blackboard because we have members that are part of other acts, different conglomerates of different things so we’re usually down there. Apart from last year where we didn’t actually play at all as Chaika I think for the last four or five years we’ve had a play around somewhere on The National. But yeah, this is our first time on the program” – Laura Bishop from Chaika chat to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“We’re looking forward to The National, really excited. This will be my second year – I had a massive ball last year, it’s one of the best festivals I’ve ever been to. We’re looking forward to lots of music, lots of late nights at the session bar and lots of tunes from all our friends from Australia and beyond” – Mairead Hurley from Restless Legs chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“We had this discussion with the band just before we started rehearsing for The National and we decided because we haven’t played Canberra that much, and a lot of people wouldn’t recognise those songs, we’re playing mainly from An Ear To The Earth. I have a couple of new songs which we ended up not having the time to rehearse and just wanted to stick with the songs that were strong”Mark Moldre chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“The folk scene here is amazing. Where we were before in Lismore, if we played three or four gigs a week we’d flood the market in one week and have to wait six months to play any more gigs. Here we can do it as much as we want. And the bands around Sydney in the folk scene have been really supportive, giving us gigs or contacts. It’s amazing”The Button Collective chat to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“We find when we’re put in the folk festival circuit you get lots of people coming up and saying “this is great that they’ve put some comedy in”. It gives people an opportunity to relax or laugh a little bit. Some folk music can be quite heavy, some of the topics that they talk about can be quite dark or heavy. I totally think it lends itself to comedy. But there’s not a lot of folk comedy people out there so it’s good to get a chance to share what we do”Sparrow-Folk chat to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“When we were younger and we were being called “bearers of the tradition” there was a weight with that. We felt like we couldn’t touch the traditional song much. With this album we’ve really rearranged the songs to suit our purposes” – Ruth Hazleton from Kate Burke & Ruth Hazleton chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“It’s a bit of a different thing I did with this album [The Wayside Ballads Vol 1]. The last two albums, I did both of those in the US and they were very acoustic based. I had these songs lying around and a good friend of ours Shannon Bourne, who’s a great guitar player, said “let’s try and do an electric album. The story’s still at the centre of the songs but it’s just a different approach to it. We picked these ten songs and went in and did them – I think it took us about a day and a half to record them. It was all done pretty much live. And I had some great players in there – we hadn’t rehearsed or anything like that so it was all pretty organic in that regards. I’m really happy with the way it turned out”Bill Jackson chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

Releases This Week

Eddie Boyd
A Lover and a FoolEddie Boyd and The Phatapillars
iTunes

Emily Barker
The Toerag SessionsEmily Barker
iTunes

Windfall
WindfallJoe Pug
iTunes

Sufjan
Carrie & LowellSufjan Stevens
iTunes

Mountain Goats
Beat The ChampThe Mountain Goats
iTunes

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

National Folk Festival

National Folk Festival

How could we not choose The National Folk Festival as this weeks gig pick. It’s going to be a cracker of a festival – will we see you there?

Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – Canberra, ACT

Gigs Next Week

Alabama Shakes
Friday 3rd and Saturday 4th April – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

All Our Exes Live In Texas
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Thursday 9th April – Ellington Jazz Club, Perth, WA
Friday 10th April – Fairbridge Folk Festival, Perth, WA

Bluesfest
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – Byron Bay, NSW

Brad Butcher
Thursday 9th April – 12 Bar Blue, Cairns, QLD

Darren Hanlon
Friday 3rd April – Karova Lounge, Ballarat, VIC
Thursday 9th April – The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba, QLD
Friday 10th April – The Zoo, Brisbane, QLD

David Gray
Sunday 5th April – Palais, Melbourne, VIC

Eddie Boyd and The Phatapillars
Sunday 5th April – The Juke Joint Stage, Bluesfest Byron Bay, NSW
Monday 6th April – The Juke Joint Stage, Bluesfest Byron Bay, NSW
Thursday 9th April – Lefties Old Time Music Hall, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 10th April – The Currumbin Creek Tavern, Currumbin, QLD

Elwood Myre
Wednesday 8th April – The Pier, Port Macquarie, NSW
Thursday 9th April – No. 5 Church St, Bellingen, NSW
Friday 10th April – Cardigan Bar, Brisbane, QLD

Fairbridge Festival
Friday 10th to Sunday 12th April – Pinjarra, WA

Festival of Small Halls feat. Gordie MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys, Siskin River
Friday 3rd to Monday 6th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Frank Turner
Sunday 5th April – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW
Monday 6th April – Amplifier, Perth, WA
Wednesday 8th April – Unibar, Adelaide, SA
Thursday 9th April – The Small Ballroom, Newcastle, NSW
Friday 10th April – The Basement, Canberra, ACT

Heartstring Quartet
Wednesday 1st to Monday 6th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 5th April – Narooma, NSW

Jake Shimabukuro
Sunday 5th April – Lizottes, Newcastle, NSW
Monday 6th April – Lizottes, Central Coast, NSW
Wednesday 8th April – Lizottes, Dee Why, NSW
Thursday 9th April – The Basement, Sydney, NSW
Friday 10th April – The Gov, Adelaide, SA

John Flanagan
Friday 10th to Sunday 12th April – Fairbridge Folk Festival, WA

Jordie Lane
Friday 10th to Sunday 12th April – Fairbridge Folk Festival, Fairbridge, WA

Justin Townes Earle w/ Sam Outlaw
Friday 3rd April – Boogie, Tallarook, VIC
Sunday 5th April – Byron Bay Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW
Thursday 9th April – Grace Emily Hotel, Adelaide, SA
Friday 10th April – Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, VIC

Kaurna Cronin
Friday 3rd April – Blenheim Music Festival, Blenheim, SA
Sunday 5th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Kim Richey
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Lucie Thorne
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Lucy Wise Trio
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – The National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Friday 10th to Sunday 12th April – Fairbridge Festival, WA

Man From Snowy River Bush Festival
Thursday 9th to Sunday 12th April – Corryong, VIC

Marlon Williams
Thursday 9th April – Gasometer, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 10th April – Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane, QLD

National Folk Festival
Thursday 2nd to Monday 6th April – Canberra, ACT

Nuala Kennedy
Friday 3rd to Monday 8th April – The National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Friday 14th April – Fairbridge Music Festival, Fairbridge, WA

Pokey LaFarge
Wednesday 8th April – Caravan Music Club, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 9th April – The Corner, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 10th April – Theatre Royal, Castlemaine, VIC

Rodrigo y Gabriela
Saturday 4th to Sunday 5th April – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW
Tuesday 7th April – The Palais, Melbourne, VIC
Thursday 9th April – Sydney Opera House, Sydney, NSW

Roland Kay-Smith
Thursday 9th April – The Grand Junction, Maitland, NSW
Friday 10th April – Django Bar, Marrickville, NSW

Sam Buckingham
Sunday 5th April – Pyramids Road Wines, Ballandean, QLD
Thursday 9th April – The Rhythm Hut, Gosford, NSW

Skyscraper Stan And The Commission Flats
Saturday 4th April – Grace Emily, Adelaide, SA
Sunday 5th April – The Loft, Warrnambool, VIC

Steve Smyth
Saturday 4th to Monday 6th April – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW
Friday 10th April – Four 5 Nine, Perth, WA

The String Contingent
Saturday 4th April – Flute & Fiddle, National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Friday 10th April – Fairbridge Folk Festival, Fairbridge, WA

Timberwolf
Friday 3rd April – Blenheim Camping and Music Festival, SA

Winterbourne
Saturday 4th to Monday 6th April – Fremantle Street Arts Festival, Fremantle, WA
Thursday 9th April – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 10 April – The Treehouse, Byron Bay, NSW

Xavier Rudd & The United Nations
Sunday 5th April – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

Friday Folk Flashback

“Jim Shank” – April Verch

National Folk Festival Interview: Restless Legs

Mairead Hurley
Image Courtesy of Mairead Hurley

Gareth Hugh Evans: I think the first time I saw you guys was actually at last year’s National Folk Festival.

Mairead Hurley: Yes, last year. We had just gotten the name last year. I had just moved to Sydney last January and I already knew Louise Phelan [fiddle] and Maeve Moynihan [fiddle] from Ireland, from going up and going to fleadhs and festivals. Then we all met Ben Stephenson [guitar, flute, bodhran] in Sydney. As a group we went to Tasmania last year to their fleadh in March. That was the first time we’d performed as Restless Legs. By the time we played at The National we weren’t billed as that because the application had gone in much earlier but it was the same line up.

This year we have a couple of new additions as well. We have Louise Phelan’s husband John Cassidy performing sean-nós dancing and we also have a new arrival in Sydney, a girl named Susan Miller, who’s a multi-instrumentalist as well – she plays fiddle, button accordian and piano as well.

GHE: I feel like you had a dancer last year as well?

MH: That was John Cassidy as well. That was Louise’s partner and they just got married earlier this year.

GHE: So yourself, Louise and Maeve played together back in Ireland?

MH: We would have all met each other and played bits here and there, not on a regular basis. More just a social basis, fleadhs and sessions and stuff. We all started playing regularly together in Sydney.

GHE: I know there’s quick a big Irish community in Sydney – within that is there a lot of musicians?

MH: Yeah, and that was the reason that both Louise and myself came to Sydney originally. There’s lots of music being co-ordinated by the Irish National Association, and they’re based in the Gaelic Club. They have a program where they regularly hire an Irish person to come and teach whatever is their chosen instrument. Louise did that for a couple of years and she still teaches with them and I came over to teach with them in 2014. The people learning are a mixture of Irish people who maybe played when they were younger and have taken it back up or Irish people who bring their kids to lessons, their kids who are Irish-Australian and then often some people who have no Irish connection at all and just pick it up because they love the music. There’s a pretty vibrant scene.

GHE: There’s obviously a difference to playing in sessions and performing on stage in front of a crowd. How do you choose which tunes and sets make it into the Restless Legs set and which are kept for the sessions?

MH: As a group of musicians we all have the same focus and priority which is kind of what makes us play well together and made us want to take the set further. That focus on very traditional tunes but also quite unusual tunes. To get away from the old classics and maybe find a few more hidden treasures within the tradition. And then mixed with newer, more contemporary stuff and occasionally finding an old standard and trying to rework it or do something different with it. It’s kind of a balance between all of those. We all kind of feed off learning new tunes from one an other and finding stuff that we want to work with. Then it’s just a matter of fine tuning it, taking arrangements and working with sounds to see what combination works best. Mostly just going with what tunes we like – it’s all about enjoying the performance and you enjoy it when you’re playing stuff that you like.

GHE: Do you have a particular type of tune that you enjoy playing?

MH: Not really. For a session and for a performance, what keeps it interesting is having a variety. Nothing in particular but we probably would focus on the faster dance tunes, reels and jigs, than anything else.

GHE: I do have to ask, but why did you learn the concertina? It’s not the most glamorous instrument in the world.

MH: What! What! I’ll change your mind about that!

GHE: I’m sorry!

MH: [laughs] It had a massive resurgence in the last 15 years which is about the time that I started playing. I think it’s because I grew up in Sligo which is predominantly fiddle and flute country. My dad’s a flute player and my uncle’s a fiddle player. From the neighbourhood that I grew up in that was what was common. I learned the flute first. And then I think it’s because the concertina was so unusual and when it started becoming a bit more widespread it was completely new to me – it was a whole new sound, it was a whole new array of things that could be done with tunes that I was just not familiar with. I just felt like I had to play that instrument and then I think once I made that decision, when I was about 14 I wouldn’t put it down any time in my waking hours. My mum can verify that!

It’s like any instrument – there are so many ways to play the same tune. So many different styles. I just think it’s great. And I think it sounds really good with fiddle in particular so I guess that’s why it works well with two girls in the band.

GHE: And it’s super portable! I think that’s why it was so popular 50 years ago with singers and players. It was something that they could just carry with them.

MH: I think that’s kind of how it ended up making its way into the Irish tradition. Because they were so portable sailors used to throw them on ships and then when the ships would come into port they’d end up in every household. It was very popular in County Clare.

GHE: One question I’ve been meaning to ask you is what it’s like to play with Ben Stephenson? He’s a bit of a hero of mine. Does having him in the band bring an audience with him?

MH: I’m not sure. Possibly. Ben’s an amazing playing and we’ve all clicked really well. Like I was saying we all share tunes and he’s very open with his music, he’s really encouraging and he’s really interested in learning from everyone else. When you get that interaction from someone it’s great. He has such amazing experience as a band member with Trouble in the Kitchen and I’ve been lucky enough to perform as a guest with them at The Woodford Folk Festival and The Port Fairy Folk Festival and the Brunswick Music Festival recently. They’ve got so much experience, they’re so well polished and Ben really does bring that experience to us a as group.

GHE: Anything else we can look forward to from you guys at The National?

MH: Just that both Maeve and Louise will be giving fiddle workshops. You’ll find them in the program. There’s an intermediate and advanced fiddle workshop with them.

We’re looking forward to The National, really excited. This will be my second year – I had a massive ball last year, it’s one of the best festivals I’ve ever been to. We’re looking forward to lots of music, lots of late nights at the session bar and lots of tunes from all our friends from Australia and beyond.

The National Folk Festival Announce Even More Artists for 2015

Kutcha Edwards
Image Courtesy of Kutcha Edwards

A bunch more artists were added to The National Folk Festival lineup this week and we can’t tell you how excited we are.

Firstly a plethora of indigenous artists will be gracing the stage at The National Folk Festival this year including soul/blues icon Kutcha Edwards, celebrated duo Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse, Golden Guitar winner Col Hardy, singer-songwriter John Bennett and the Djaadjawan Dancers.

These artists will be joined by the freshly announced My Friend The Chocolate Cake, Shane Howard, Christopher Coleman Collective, Restless Legs, Alex and Annette Hood, The Bush Music Club, The Button Collective, The Coalbrook Band, Coolfinn Mac, Folklore, John Peel, Lime and Steel, Round Mountain Girls, Ryebuck Bush Band, Scots on the Rocks, Señor Cabrales, Southern Cross Trawlers, The Transylvaniacs, Waiting For Guinness, The String Contingent, Ukulele Republic of Canberra, Cathie O’Sullivan, Coral Eden and the Melbourne Colonial Dancers, Dingo’s Breakfast, Frank Povah and Chris Cruise, Keith McKenry and Santa Taranta.

The National Folk Festival takes place over the Easter Long Weekend from the 2nd to the 6th April 2015. For more information check out the official site here.

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