Out on the Weekend Announces 2017 Lineup

Justin Townes Earle
Image Courtesy of Justin Townes Earle

This morning Australia’s premiere Americana festival Out On The Weekend released their 2017 lineup and as expected it’s pretty impressive.

Heading up the lineup is the incomparable Justin Townes Earle who will be taking to the stage with a full band in tow. Joining him from the US will be the legendary Son Volt and Americana super group Traveller featuring Jonny Fritz, Robert Ellis and Cory Chisel.

The rest of the lineup is simply cracking with a who’s who of the local and international scene including All Our Exes Live In Texas, The Deslondes, Robbie Fulks, Fanny Lumsden, The Sadies, Joshua Hedley, Raised by Eagles, Freya Josephine Hollick, Davidson Brothers and The Moonee Valley Drifters.

“It’s a continued pleasure to bring music lovers the finest sounds in the international and local Americana scene to the glorious Seaworks venue,” promotors Love Police said. “Four years strong and building, we aim to put on an excellent day of cultural and important entertainment hand picked for your pleasure. We used to talk up the fine food and booze selections on offer, but that goes without saying now. Its always the best! Avoid imitations and late comers, Out On The Weekend is the real deal. Authentic presentations by passionate people with colourful experience. Buy a ticket, get your look on, study up on acts you don’t know, and see you in October for the good times.”

Out On The Weekend is held at Seaworks in Melbourne on the 14th October this year. For more information including how to get your hands on tickets check out the official site here.

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 23rd June

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

Angus & Julia Stone returned with their new single “Snow”. Details here

– Folk music legend Martin Simpson announced his new album Trails & Tribulations. Details here

Dashville Skyline announced their first round of artists for 2017 including Mark Olson & Ingunn Ringvold, Tim Easton, Songs From Dan, Mel Parsons, The Roamin’ Jasmine, Cash Savage and The Last Drinks, William Crighton, Immigrant Union, Claire Anne Taylor, Lachlan Bryan & The Wildes, Pony Face, Emma Russack and Roadhouses. Details here

Fleet Foxes released their new single “If You Need To, Keep Time On Me”. Details here

– Brisbane based alt-country singer-songwriter Brad Butcher has announced plans to release his new album From The Bottom Of A Well. Details here

Iron & Wine has just released his first single in four years titled “Call It Dreaming”. Details here

– Singer-songwriter Julia Jacklin released her new video “Eastwick”. Details here

– Irish-born, Melbourne-based singer-songwriter Áine Tyrrell released her confronting new video “Don’t Be Left Crying”. Details here

– The Mullum Music Festival announced 10 artists for their 2017 event including Jon Cleary & The Monster Gentlemen, Frazey Ford, Marlon Williams & The Yarra Benders, Lindi Ortega, Too Many Zooz, Z-Star Delta, Gabriel Garzón-Montano, The East Pointers, The Teskey Brothers and Jazz Party. Details here

– English singer-songwriter Johnny Flynn released his new video “In The Deepest”. Details here

– Bluegrass favourites Davidson Brothers kick off their east coast tour tonight in Canberra. Details here

– Troubadour Stu Larsen released his new single “Chicago Song”. Details here

Reviews

Track by Track

“A couple of weeks ago Sydney based singer-songwriter Timothy James Bowen highly anticipated new EP Bloom. Bowen describes the EP as bookending everything that’s happened to him in the last year – much of which he spent fighting a type of blood cancer”Timothy James Bowen takes us his EP Bloom. Track by Track here

Releases This Week

Jeff Tweedy
Together At LastJeff Tweedy
iTunes

QPS
Follow The RiverQueen Porter Stomp
Bandcamp

Ahern
The Ahern BrothersThe Ahern Brothers
iTunes

Tulalah
The QuestionTulalah
Bandcamp

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Queen Porter Stomp w/ Giffen, Whoa Mule

Queen Porter Stomp

Dirty swamp masters Queen Porter Stomp launch their new album Follow The River in Sydney this weekend supported by Giffen and Whoa Mule

Saturday 24th June – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Gigs Next Week

All Our Exes Live In Texas
Friday 23rd June – Jive, Adelaide, SA
Saturday 24th June – Babushka, Perth, WA
Sunday 25th June – Fly By Night, Fremantle, WA
Friday 30th June – Heritage Hotel, Bulli, NSW

Amber Lawrence & Catherine Britt w/ Fanny Lumsden
Friday 23rd June – Rainforest Ranch, Rockhampton, QLD
Saturday 24th June – Carrier’s Arms Hotel Motel, Maryborough, QLD
Thursday 29th June – Club Barham, Barham, VIC
Friday 30th June – Commercial Club, Albury, NSW

Andy Golledge Band, Caitlin Harnett, Ruben Neeson
Friday 30th June – LazyBones Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Anna Cordell w/ Hollie Joyce
Saturday 24th June – Longplay, Melbourne, VIC

Anne of the Wolves
Friday 23rd June – The Thornbury Local, Melbourne, VIC

Argyle Sun-Sets at Fred’s feat. Larissa Tandy, Sam Newton, Nick Payne
Sunday 25th June – Upstairs at Fred’s, Camden, VIC

Ben Ottewell
Tuesday 27th June – Mojo’s Bar, Fremantle, WA
Wednesday 28th June – Four5Nine, Perth, WA
Thursday 29th June – Crown and Anchor, Adelaide, SA
Friday 30th June – Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, VIC

Ben Salter
Friday 23rd June – Theatre Royal, Castlemaine, VIC

Blue Mountains Winter Magic Festival
Saturday 24th June – Katoomba, NSW

Brad Butcher w/ The Weeping Willows
Friday 23rd June – House Concert, Geelong, VIC
Saturday 24th June – House Concert, Carrum, VIC
Sunday 25th June – House Concert, Bittern, VIC
Friday 30th June – The Singing Gallery, McLaren Vale, SA

Broads
Friday 23rd June – The Junk Bar, Brisbane, QLD
Sunday 25th June – Bellingen Brewery, Bellingen, NSW

Busby Marou
Friday 23rd June – The Northshore Tavern, Perth, WA
Saturday 24th June – Mundaring Weir Hotel, Mundaring, WA
Sunday 25th June – The Boston, Perth, WA
Friday 30th June – Darwin Entertainment Centre, Darwin, NT

Carus Thompson
Friday 23rd June – Wesley Anne, Melbourne, VIC

Catherine Traicos
Sunday 25th June – Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, VIC
Thursday 29th June – Fly By Night, Fremantle, WA

Daniel Champagne
Friday 23rd June – The Tea Club Nowra, Nowra, NSW
Saturday 24th June – Polish White Eagle Club, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 25th June – Leadbelly, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 29th June – Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 30th June – NightQuarter, Gold Coast, QLD

Davidson Brothers
Friday 23rd June – Harmonie German Club, Canberra, ACT
Saturday 24th June – Nethercote Hall, Nethercote, NSW

Devil Goat Family String Band
Saturday 24th June – Bar Open, Melbourne, VIC

Dusty Ravens w/ Low Down Riders
Friday 30th June – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Emma Davis
Friday 23rd June – Frank’s Wild Years, Thirroul, NSW

Folk Fun Fiesta feat. Den Hanrahan and the Rum Runners, Fred Smith, Zumpa
Saturday 24th June – Centro CBD, Wollongong, NSW

FolkSwagon feat. Pilot Hergé, Ethan Conway, Hannah Robinson
Wednesday 28th June – Cafe Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Hanny J w/ Emmy Hour, Squid Fishing, Quinton Trembath
Sunday 25th June – Reverence Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Hayden Calnin
Friday 30th June – Hudson Ballroom, Sydney, NSW

Honey & Knives
Friday 23rd June – 5 Church St, Bellingen, NSW
Friday 30th June – 63 First Ave, Sawtell, NSW

Instrumental (adj.), Hinterlandt, Brian Campeau
Friday 23rd June – 107 Projects, Sydney, NSW

Jacob Diamond
Friday 23rd June – Odd Fellow, Fremantle, WA
Friday 30th June – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD

James Ellis and the Jealous Guys w/ Georgia Mulligan, Ainsley Farrell
Friday 23rd June – Botany View Hotel, Sydney, NSW

Jasmine Beth, Melanie Horsnell, Tidal Moon
Saturday 24th June – Lovett Chapel, Yass, NSW
Sunday 25th June – Bundanoon Memorial Hall, Bundanoon, NSW

Jen Mize
Friday 23rd June – Bohemian Bungalow, Eumundi, QLD
Saturday 24th June – The Basement, Nambour, QLD

Kuranda Roots Festival
Friday 23rd and Saturday 24th June – Kuranda, QLD

Larissa Tandy w/ Brooke Russell and The Mean Reds
Friday 23rd June – Petersham Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW
Sunday 25th June – House Concert, Camden, NSW
Friday 30th June – Baha, Rye, VIC

Leah Senior
Saturday 24th June – Golden Age, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 29th June – The End, Brisbane, QLD

Les Thomas
Friday 23rd June – Kingsbury Bowls Club, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 30th June – Kingsbury Bowls Club, Melbourne, VIC

Liam Gerner
Saturday 24th June – The Wesley Anne, Melbourne, VIC

Lisa Crawley
Thursday 29th June – Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne, VIC

Lisa Mitchell and Dustin Tebbutt w/ Alex The Astronaut
Friday 23rd June – Newport Hotel, Fremantle, WA
Saturday 24th June – Badlands, Perth, WA
Thursday 29th June – Corner Hotel, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 30th June – Corner Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Liz Stringer’s Big Tuesday String-a-long feat. Mick Thomas
Tuesday 27th June – The Gasometer, Melbourne, VIC

Lloyd Spiegel
Friday 23rd June – The Piping Hot Chicken Shop, Ocean Grove, VIC
Friday 30th June – The Skylark Room, Upwey, VIC

Lowdown Hokum Orchestra
Friday 23rd June – Burrinja, Upwey, VIC

Lucy & Rowena Wise, John Flanagan
Saturday 24th June – House Concert, Melbourne, VIC

Mr Alford Country
Saturday 24th June – Union Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Music on a Mission feat. Hussy Hicks, Leopold’s Treat
Wednesday 28th June – Miami Marketta, Gold Coast, QLD

Newport Folk Festival
Friday 30th to Sunday 2nd July – Newport, VIC

Nigel Wearne
Sunday 25th June – Blarney Books & Art, Port Fairy, VIC

Queen Porter Stomp w/ Giffen, Whoa Mule
Saturday 24th June – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Ramblin’ Nights feat. Katie Brianna, De’May, Jemma Nicole
Wednesday 28th June – Leadbelly, Sydney, NSW

Slava & Sharon Grigoryan
Friday 23rd June – St Paul’s Lutheran Church, Shepparton, VIC

Sofar Sounds Melbourne
Saturday 24th June – Melbourne, VIC

Sofar Sounds Sydney
Thursday 29th June – Martin Place, Sydney, NSW

Song Seshes feat. Gentle Leader, Jess Keating Music, Pyjama Sam Productions, Rita B
Saturday 24th June – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

Songs of the Land and Sea feat. The Cutting, Andy Alberts
Saturday 24th June – Port Fairy Lecture Hall, Port Fairy, VIC

Sunday Sessions feat. Mitch Power
Sunday 25th June – The Public Brewery, Melbourne, VIC

Taryn La Fauci
Thursday 29th June – Townsville, QLD

The Ahern Brothers
Thursday 29th June – Treehouse, Byron Bay, NSW
Friday 30th June – 5 Church Street, Bellingen, NSW

The Bean Project
Friday 23rd June – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT
Saturday 24th June – That Little Brewery, Melbourne, VIC

The Grigoryan Brothers
Sunday 25th June – Wesley of Warragul, Warragul, VIC
Friday 30th June – Kyneton Town Hall, Kyneton, VIC

The Heggarties w/ The Cherry Pickers
Saturday 24th June – The Retreat Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

The Spooky Men’s Chorale
Friday 23rd June – Newcastle City Hall, Newcastle, NSW
Saturday 24th June – Wollongong Town Hall, Wollongong, NSW
Wednesday 28th June – The Old Museum, Brisbane, QLD

The Wayward Henrys
Friday 23rd June – Flow Bar, Old Bar, NSW

Tom Stephens w/ eush, Bonniesongs, Sam Hughes
Saturday 24th June – RAD, Wollongong, NSW

Toni Swain
Sunday 25th June – Union Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Vardos Trio
Saturday 24th June – Bocskai Centre, Melbourne, VIC

Friday Folk Flashback

“All The Pretty Little Horses” – Odetta

Putting the creepy back into lullabies.

Davidson Brothers Announce East Coast Tour

Davidson Brothers
Image Courtesy of Davidson Brothers

Sibling bluegrass duo Davidson Brothers will be heading out on tour from this week with shows planned up and down the East Coast. The tour will also see Davidson Brothers appearing at a couple of festivals including the Gympie Music Muster and the Deni Ute Muster.

Davidson Brothers will be touring their latest album All You Need Is Music – check out the full list of dates and their latest video “Take A Little Drive” below:

Friday 23rd June – Harmonie German Club, Canberra, ACT
Saturday 24th June – Nethercote Hall, Nethercote, NSW
Saturday 8th July – Union Hotel, Melbourne, VIC
Sunday 20th August – Petersham Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 24th August – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th August – Gympie Music Muster, Gympie, QLD
Friday 29th September – Deni Ute Muster, Deniliquin, NSW

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 31st March

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

Laura Marling added Brisbane, Adelaide and Melbourne dates to her tour schedule this June. Details here

Folk ‘Til Ya Punk Records announced Brisbane folk-punk festival BRISFOPO featuring The Dead Maggies, Fox n Firkin, The Button Collective, The Rogue Scholars, Andy Paine, The Dangerous Folk, Quinton Trembath and Jim Mongrel and more. Details here

– The Davidson Brothers released their new video “Take A Little Drive”. Details here

Emily Barker released her new video “Sunrise” and announced that she’s in Australia this week and next with tour dates in south west WA, Sydney and Melbourne. Details here

Releases This Week

Imelda May
Life Love Flesh BloodImelda May
iTunes

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Broads

Broads

Melbourne alt-country duo Broads launch their new album Vacancy in their home town.

Saturday 1st April – Toff In Town, Melbourne, VIC

Gigs Next Week

Amber Lawrence & Catherine Britt
Friday 31st March – Red Hot Music, Devonport, TAS
Saturday 1st April – Granada Tavern, Hobart, TAS
Friday 7th April – Rooty Hill RSL, Rooty Hill, NSW

Archer, Sweet Jelly Rolls, Simone East
Saturday 1st April – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

BATTS
Sunday 2nd April – Some Velvet Morning, Melbourne, VIC

Bill Chambers, Raechel Whitchurch
Thursday 6th April – House Concert, Parkes, NSW
Friday 7th April – Club Mudgee, Mudgee, NSW

Bonnie Raitt
Friday 7th April – State Theatre, Sydney, NSW

Broads
Saturday 1st April – Toff In Town, Melbourne, VIC

Brigadoon Highland Gathering
Saturday 1st April – Bundanoon, NSW

Darcy Fox
Friday 31st March – The Newsagency, Sydney, NSW
Wednesday 5th April – The Grace Emily, Adelaide, SA

Emily Barker
Tuesday 4th April – The Cidery and Blackwood Valley Brewing Company, Bridgetown, WA
Wednesday 5th April – Little Village Music, Dunsborough, WA
Thursday 6th April – Babushka, Perth, WA

Eveleigh Works Grand Opening feat. The Sweet Jelly Rolls, Indigo Rising, Skyscraper Stan
Sunday 2nd April – Eveleigh Works, Sydney, NSW

Fanny Lumsden
Friday 7th April – Rooty Hill RSL, Rooty Hill, NSW

FolkSwagon feat. Georgie Fisher, Burden Man, Maia Marsh
Wednesday 5th April – Cafe Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Grigoryan Brothers
Saturday 1st April – City Recital Hall, Sydney, NSW
Sunday 2nd April – Lizottes, Newcastle, NSW
Tuesday 4th April – Macquarie Conservatorium of Music, Dubbo, NSW
Wednesday 5th April – Capitol Theatre, Tamworth, NSW
Thursday 6th April – TAS Hoskins Centre, Armidale, NSW
Friday 7th April – Bellingen Memorial Hall, Bellingen, NSW

Heartbreaker Sessions feat. De’May, Bill Hunt
Sunday 2nd April – The Bearded Tit, Sydney, NSW

Hinterlandt
Saturday 1st April – 5 Church Street, Bellingen, NSW
Sunday 2nd April – The Unorthodox Church of Groove, Newcastle, NSW

Hollie Matthew, Swamp Fat Jangles
Saturday 1st April – Bearded Tit, Sydney, NSW

Holly Throsby
Friday 31st March – Babushka, Perth, WA

Irish Mythen
Friday 31st March – Old Castlemaine Gaol, Castlemaine, VIC
Saturday 1st April – Baby Black, Bacchus Marsh, VIC
Sunday 2nd April – Old Church on The Hill, Bendigo, VIC
Wednesday 5th April – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT
Thursday 6th April – Leadbelly, Sydney, NSW
Friday 7th April – The Heritage, Bulli, NSW

Jack Carty
Friday 31st March – Paddington Uniting Church, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 6th April – Ellington Jazz Club, Perth, WA
Friday 7th April – Always Good Nights, Bunbury, WA

Jeff Lang
Friday 31st March – Trinity Sessions, Adelaide, SA
Saturday 1st April – Lefties, Whyalla, SA
Thursday 6th April – Royal Oak, Launceston, TAS
Friday 7th April – Republic Bar, Hobart, TAS

Josh Rennie-Hynes
Friday 31st March – Trinity Sessions, Adelaide, SA

Kasey Chambers
Friday 7th April – Theatre Royal, Hobart, TAS
Saturday 8th April – Country Club Showroom, Launceston, TAS
Sunday 9th April – Burnie Arts Centre, Burnie, TAS

Kate Miller-Heidke
Friday 31st March – Perth Concert Hall, Perth, WA
Friday 7th April – Canberra Theatre, Canberra, ACT

Kasey Chambers
Thursday 6th April – Devonport Entertainment Centre, Devonport, TAS
Friday 7th April – Theatre Royal, Hobart, TAS

Last Weekend at The Newsagency
Friday 1st and Saturday 2nd April – The Newsagency, Sydney, NSW

Les Poules à Colin
Friday 31st March – Illawarra Folk Club, Wollongong, NSW
Wednesday 5th April – Upper Landsdowne Memorial Hall, Upper Landsdowne, NSW
Thursday 6th April – House Concert, Newcastle, NSW

Liv Cartledge
Saturday 1st April – Wesley Anne, Melbourne, VIC

Mal Webb and Kylie Morrigan
Sunday 3rd April – Bar 303, Melbourne, VIC

Martha Tilston
Friday 31st March – Leadbelly, Sydney, NSW
Saturday 1st April – Heritage Hotel, Bulli, NSW
Sunday 2nd April – Brass Monkey, Cronulla, NSW

Peasant Moon w/ Sam Shinazzi and Arna Georgia
Thursday 6th April – Gasoline Pony, Sydney, NSW

Rick Hart’s Bare Bones Quartet
Friday 7th April – The Drunken Poet, Melbourne, VIC

Sarah Belkner
Friday 31st March – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 6th April – Wesley Anne, Melbourne, VIC

Sleepy West, James Franklin, Cat Canteri
Saturday 1st April – Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC

Sydney Bluegrass & Old-Time Music Get-together
Friday 1st April – Annandale Neighbourhood Centre, Sydney, NSW

The Bean Project w/ Patrick Wilson
Friday 7th April – The B.East, Melbourne, VIC

The Button Collective
Friday 31st March – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 7th April – The Two Goats, Armidale, NSW

The East Pointers
Friday 31st March – Tanks Arts Centre, Cairns, QLD
Saturday 1st April – Sol Bar, Sunshine Coast, QLD
Thursday 6th April – Club Mullum (Mullumbimby Ex-Services Club), Mullumbimby, NSW
Friday 7th April – Eatonsville Hall, Eatonsville, NSW

The Man From Snowy River Festival
Thursday 30th March to Sunday 2nd April – Corryong, VIC

The McClymonts
Friday 7th April – Goulburn Workers, Goulburn, NSW

The Mountain Goats
Thursday 6th April – Badlands, Perth, WA
Friday 7th April – Fowlers Live, Adelaide, SA

The Sauerkrauts
Friday 7th April – House Concert, Nowra, NSW

The Waifs
Saturday 1st April – Enmore Theatre, Sydney, NSW
Sunday 2nd April – The Governor Hindmarsh, Adelaide, SA
Tuesday 4th April – Bangalow Hall, Bangalow, NSW
Wednesday 5th April – Bangalow Hall, Bangalow, NSW
Thursday 6th April – The Tivoli Theatre, Brisbane, QLD

This Way North
Saturday 1st April – Prince Of Wales Hotel, Bunbury, WA
Sunday 2nd April – The Carine, Duncraig, WA

Tim Guy
Friday 7th April – Edinburgh Castle, Melbourne, VIC

Violent Femmes
Friday 31st March – Twin Towns, Coolangatta, QLD
Saturday 1st April – The Shed at Aussie World, Sunshine Coast, QLD

William Crighton
Friday 5th May – Bella Union Trades Hall, Melbourne, VIC

Friday Folk Flashback

“Stags Bellow” – Martha Tilston

Watch the New Davidson Brothers Video “Take A Little Drive”

Davidson Brothers
Photos by Elizabeth Walton

Victorian bluegrass legends Davidson Brothers have just released their brand new video “Take A Little Drive”. The track is a taster of the duo’s eighth studio album All You Need Is Music which is due on the 7th April.

“Take A Little Drive” is a wonderful slice of classic country and bluegrass music – check out the video below:

To celebrate the release of All You Need Is Music Davidson Brothers just announced an album launch show at the newly opened Longhorn Saloon in Melbourne on the 28th April. For more information check out the official Facebook event here.

2017 Blue Mountains Music Festival – The Wrap

Paul Kelly and Charlie Owen doing Funeral Songs

Words and Pictures by Elizabeth Walton

“Can’t wait for this to start – Paul Kelly is Australia’s answer to Bob Dylan.”  So the murmur of the audience flows while revelers wait in the light filled entrance to the Lurline Pavilion at the 2017 Blue Mountains Music Festival.

“Nah mate, Bob Dylan is America’s answer to Paul Kelly,” comes the well whittled retort, a fitting reflection on the loyalty of the Australian pilgrimage to the Blue Mountains Music Festival, where Australia’s tower of song – Paul Kelly – has appeared many times.

The punters flood the moment with favourite festival stories, washed down with a good pint of Guinness. Mustering the strength to move past the thousands to the front of stage where you can really get lost in the experience – that’s what they are pausing at the entrance to do, for this is the festival’s main event – and that’s all part of the show.

Katoomba may be the original decaf soy latte kinda town, but the Blue Mountains Music Festival is still a double ristretto kind of event. Headliners including Kelly and The Waifs may have returned countless times, but you’d wonder why you would want to change something that clearly ain’t broke.

As the rain pours down, the mud slides up. The cafes flow with conversations filled with passionate responses to Gregg Borschmann’s Heartland Conversations, the virtues of six dollar gumboots, and the best fashion statement you can make with a plastic yellow poncho without face planting in the mud.

Paul Kelly hit the stage with his latest project, Death’s Dateless Night, an album of funeral songs recorded with collaborator Charlie Owen on dobro and keys, tenderly harmonized by Kelly’s own clan of daughters, the beautiful Memphis ad Maddie. The audience loved it, but loved it even more when the band eventually visited the song man’s own material. Though Kelly invited the audience to lay him down a pallet on the floor, and to just let it be, the cheers definitely grew louder when “To her Door” finally opened on centre stage.

The festival opened with acts including Caiti Baker, whose vocal style leaves you feeling that she wants to blow the walls of the theatre down, get out into the open where she can feel the  wind moving in her hair. The space seems a little small for her raging sound, verging from lyrical blues to a good decent growl. She tells us on Saturday she’ll be down on the Lurline Pavilion, the main outdoor stage at the show, though she pronounces it less like the colloquial Lur-lign, and more like Lur-Leene, rhyming the venue with Dolly Parton’s Joe-line, and soon has the audience singing along with her to an impromptu bash at Dolly’s favourite tune.

On Saturday night the Big Tent looks like it might fill with water, instead it’s a flood of grey hair and beanies, people moshing around in the mud in their comfy hand-made  knits and sensible weather wear. But if that gives a distinctively silver streaked view of the pilgrims, that’s only because the young ones are moshing at the front of the Main Stage, grooving out to Urthboy with his dub overlays and ultra chill. If you’re lucky this weekend you’ll only have gone through three pairs of water-ready shoes a day, your children won’t have sunk chin-deep in the mud, and you will be very happy with the new era of sounds washed in by Urthboy – where it’s standing room only up near the doof as the crowd gets all up close and personal like, pressed in so close that they leave the rest of the pavilion entirely empty. Up close and personal is the real thing when techo fans assemble to watch a row of straight standing personnel in front of a giant DJ desk, laying down the riffs over a deep sonic tonic.  Meanwhile,  a raft of festival volunteers politely excuse themselves from duty so they can catch the last 15 minutes of boyfilled Urth. This has always been a festival that knew its demographic well, and takes no umbrance with serving up something for everyone. From Blue Grass to Trad Folk, the genres represented expand the very notion of what seems like a 360 degree perpetually evolving spectrum of musical styles.

In a world where festivals are born, reach their peak and quickly fade, this event is now hosting third generation folk who wouldn’t have this gig played out any other way. The audience is right at home with the cabaret style humour of The Loveys, who’ve flown all the way from Mullum, bringing along their jokes about yoga and farmers’ market twee. They clink their way through a set in German,  which slips past their too-red lips and over-stated eyewear, their gentrified hats, and putt great-grandma’s Royal Doulton to a new, unintended use as the china tinkers out a syncopated funk. Midway through the gig one of the ladies asks for LSD – but it turns out she isn’t craving the hallucinatory type, she’s just after a Latte Soy Dandelion. Nailing the piss-take on all things modern circa 2017, from transgender marital departures to personality disorders – even the pursuit of happiness isn’t spared from their material. But they’re not popular just for their good humour, they’re a festival highlight because they’re absolutely gorgeous and very bloody good – especially the well grounded Bass Uke of Madeleine Liddy, who churns out a phat sound reminiscent of McCartney’s Hoffman – a sound others in the same venue struggled to achieve.

Perhaps that’s just down to luck, or it could be technique, but Liddy doesn’t think so. “It’s because it’s preloved,” she says. “And it’s well-worn in,” she adds with a cheeky wink, much like the general spirit of these grand duchies. “Oh, and it hasn’t got any varnish”.  Well that’s definitely it, wouldn’t you think? Some might think it’s just a great attitude shared amongst these ladies, including Janet Swain, who appears clad in a spectacular green velvet robe, reclaimed from some Victorian widow’s wardrobe.  She wears her threads comfortably as she honks and hauls her bassoon like a baritone sax.

A honkin and a yankin in some unintended direction is all par for the course, from the street buskers grooving overdubbed percussive raps on part-filled glass bottles, to Mic Conway’s Junk Band, giving himself an onstage vasectomy with a saw played so nostalgically that the audience asks “who is that woman singing with that distinctive voice”. It’s not a woman singing, it’s Conway’s vitals begging for mercy as he slashes out his aptly nervous and wobbly tune. His side kick is the amazing sousaphone player dubbed “Marjorie Snodgrass” for this line up, who sometimes cameos in the Cope Street Parade.  She spends an hour after the event lavishing praise upon Lewis the Sound Guy for “getting” that she is the bass – whether she’s pumping her sousa, or an impeccably rendered mouth-impro bass jug. They don’t call it a junk band for nothing. The mutual admiration continues until Lewis and most of the band discover they’re all neighbours in Sydney’s eclectic inner west.

Lewis covers the event every year, bringing his own mics to work his room, The Clarendon Theatre, whose plush trim is renowned for delivering a distinctively flat sound that Lewis successfully overcomes without the aid of the high end, crystal clear gear and production values of the main stages. It’s a challenge, but like all Blue Mountains Festival devotees, one which he could perhaps best be described as pathologically drawn to. The rigors of the job are largely performed by the unknown and the unthanked, but the dooers of these unseen tasks are usually destined to return.  Once the festival gets into the blood, it’s a well fixed hooked.

True to form the mountains throws its unaustralian weather – unaustralian because even folk from the Arctic Circle cry that it’s freezing cold. In the Arctic at least when it rains it falls as snow – a dry white dust that easily brushes off. The Blue Mountains offer a unique kind of soak that seeps right into your soul. Then come the complaints from the uninitiated, rain weary after three days trudging around in it. “I’d rather live in Canada than live in this!” Yes, you probably would, but that’s part of the attraction of the mountains, and it’s why all those silver streaks are standing there happily in their sensible outdoor gear. There’s a saying in the mountains – there’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad gear. Get the good gear and you’re right to go.

Yet for the musos actually from the Arctic Circle such as The Jerry Cans, they’ve found their ‘other world’, a far departure from the Australian places they’ve previously played, melting  in the heat, discovering only then that the reason they developed a style of playing so fast was to stop themselves from freezing to death. From Adelaide to Darwin they preserved their organs from overheating on frenetic energy at a gazillion degrees. The weather doesn’t seem to have impeded their throat singing, electrified fiddle and squeeze box filled riot of a style. Here they discover they can finally crank it up and get back to their original pace. And the crowd rises to meet them, foot stomping in the newly created dance pit at the front of the Guinness tent – a welcome inclusion in an event that has always been considered a  ”concert” festival – one where you can expect to be able to sit comfortably in your bucket seats without your view being jiggled into obscurity – now there is room for both kinds of audience – the dancers and the dedicated listeners, and a wonderful world it is that can comfortably accommodate the two.

David Ross Macdonald presents a twangy six strings of metal  guitar that looks as if it could do with a bit of new brass, but it comes across sweet like a classical guitar, using a capo fretted style so soft and light that the end result is not unlike a uke. He invites the audience to join him as he croons upon how badly he craves to be held, and though his guitar looks like it might have seen better days, it’s perfect for such a setting on a night like this, offering a sound that’s subtle yet delivers a surprising level of depth.

The Mission Songs Project brings new life to the voices of the stolen generation and indigenous Australians who were splintered from their cultures when they were made to sing in a foreign language. Today, traditional languages are so far removed from their vernacular that singing in English has become the mainstay, the local languages have become the foreign tongue. Yet everything has its resurgence if you can claim it before it achieves vanishing point. The stories are heartfelt and beautifully sung – perhaps not with the campfire instruments of their natural settings, but the end result is one that adapts well to the contemporary stage and travels to a diverse and broad audience – for The Mission Songs Project, this is mission accomplished, and accomplished incredibly well.

In a festival world where every  outfit seems to have developed the mandatory uke moment, comes the strident yards of  a bush ranging balladeer – uke man William Crighton – nine parts murderer and one part hipster, tantalising the drama enthralled-audience, half of whom are  scared out of their minds that he might wield his tiny stringed box like an axe and murder them on the spot as he thumps between the rows– the other half of whom are hoping to hell that he will! Yet William makes his way back to the stage and continues his conquest to drown you in his jaded and heartbroke view of the world without ever shedding even a drop of blood.

Meanwhile the ground becomes a cup more filled with water-making-mud than one half empty, and the deserted stalls and food courts in the school grounds stand forgotten as no-one can reach them without a plank.

The 2016 Youth Award Winners The Bean Project  pulled off a surprisingly sorrowful set of sadness for ones who’ve yet to spend their youth. The brass section of this mighty duo invokes the gentlest French horn, muted the old fashioned way, with a palm holding back the full force of the sound. It is reserved, civilized, and remains gentlemanly, until Bryce Turcato takes away his hand and builds to a punchy solo, fluid with delicately placed 9ths and unresolved 7ths, while his mate Ben Langdon stares at him earnestly through his horn rimmed glasses, and flicks back his long blonde bob as he deftly states to his departed love, “I’ve never been alone more than I am here in your bed”.  The rays of light reached down and kissed him when she left, he says, before telling us that they cut their teeth in noisy pubs where not even the walls were listening. It’s an unsettling surprise now, here, in this theatre, he tells us, to finally have our attention. After Bryce finishes ripping through his brass staccato, he falls back into a noble style, summoning images of a call to hunt, all regal caps and whips and beagles.

“This next song will be sung in Islamic,” says the singer from My Bubba. This is a duo of damsels, one of whom looks like she’s emerged from legal secretarial school, with her closed-toe cloth pumps and knee length linen black shift, a look finished with a single strand of plastic aqua coloured pearls. They sing with the restraint of those who might be found in the dusty chambers of the law academy, yet the result of all that restraint produces something akin to an angelic ascendance, with soft harmonies beautifully entwined around a heavenly, harp like instrumental style. They look as though they might butterfly kiss each other at any moment with a naked eyelash.  These are the kind of virginal maidens that can maintain their composure and remain incongruously well groomed amidst a sea of people with wet hair and faces flung with splats of rain. If you can imagine the restraint that may invoke in their vocalising, then you’ve grasped the concept.

By Sunday, Stage 6 is dubbed Big Top Lake, and the Tantric Turtle along with all the other venues on the green are pulled.  A quick rethink and the audience and most of the acts are all reshuffled. No-one who has already played misses out. A new program is issued, the details are publicised on social media, and everyone is right to go. According to the seasoned stage crew who have built this mini city countless times and painstakingly pack it all down at festival end, this decision was more to do with the indoor lake and wanting to make sure everyone had a great time than anything else. Though folklore may want it remembered differently, it was less to do with the depth of the mud, which as far as outdoor events go, wasn’t as bad as it might have been. You might say it was deep enough, but not as deep as the festival from somewhere up north, where once upon a time some chick went so far down in the mud that she completely disappeared and has never been seen since, or so the story goes. Perhaps she showed up sometime later in the Manning Bar at Sydney Uni. But this is the Blue Mountains, where you’d have to think she selected her moment of re-emergence to coincide with first beers at the ever popular Boho Bar, run by all the dedicated mums and dads and rank and file members of Katoomba’s P & Cs. The festival is the major fund raiser, and the flush of funds surging through the veins of the schools for the past 21 years has made for a formidable contribution to a cash strapped cultural enclave of a town that couldn’t have achieved this in any other way. It’s an undeniable contribution to the advancement of wellbeing for the local munchkins, but you’ve got to wonder how they get on when the playground is as trashed as this – yet Katoomba is a town with a can-do kind of pride, a place where people are going to make do with whatever they’re handed to make do with. At least there’s no cars bogged in at 3am with volunteers desperately trying to pull them out, in a push-me-pull-you kind of experience never to be forgotten. And never to be repeated, now that parking is banned from the grounds.

The full gamut of natural disasters may have threatened to unleash the doors of doom upon the festival many of times– yet they never have. From deep mud to the high winds that huffed and puffed til they blew Lurline Pav down before opening a few years back, to this year’s  demise of the main indoor venue – Katoomba RSL – which burnt to the ground just a couple of weeks ago, this festival, like Katoomba itself,  is a foot soldier of survival. You can blow her big top down, you can burn her to the ground, but the show will go on, and the founding Festival Co-Directors Bob Charter and Al Ward are well seasoned masters of the quick switch.

Though this year sees the departure of co-founder Al Ward after 21 successful years in production, Bob still managed to pull off the switch and brought the shy wallflower that is the Palais Royale into play while the cinders at the RSL were still hot. Even the most established K-Town aficionados were not yet acquainted with this grand old dame of art deco Katoomba, who willingly submitted her services to the impromptu role of third venue for the festival.  The plush comfort and stately grandeur of the Palais Royale was well admired by all – a venue whose grandiose chandeliers set  the mood for dulcet tones that could woo even the most jaded festival goer.

Reaching out to this venue is a master stroke for the festival, and you can be sure bands and revelers alike will definitely want her back. It’s too good a venue to refuse for a festival that stands proud amongst a battlefield of fallen events. And as the much loved Blue Mountains Music Festival heads towards her quarter century of service, long may she reign.  All hail The Festival, and all she represents.

– Elizabeth Walton is a freelance writer, photographer and musician

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 3rd February

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

– UK blues and roots legends Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats and Australian troubadour C.W. Stoneking are teaming up for a co-headline tour this March. Details here

– Indie-folk singer-songwriter Sam Buckingham released her new single “The Water” and announced east coast tour dates. Details here

Davidson Brothers announced details of their eighth studio album All You Need Is Music. Details here

– Melbourne based alt-country crooners Broads announced their new album Vacancy. Details here

– This Saturday some of Perth’s finest songwriters including Timothy Nelson, Helen Shanahan, Joel Barker, Jacob Diamond and Billie Rogers are coming together for 1x1x1 at Fringe World. Details here

Lucie Thorne and The Yearlings have announced a joint east coast tour later this month. Details here

Old Crow Medicine Show started streaming their previously unreleased track “Black-Haired Québécoise”. Details here

– Alt-country singer Luke Collings released his debut single “If You Bring The Whiskey (I’ll Bring The Blues)”. Details here

Releases This Week

Eliza Carthy
Big MachineEliza Carthy and The Wayward Band
iTunes

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Pekka Kuusisto and the Australian Chamber Orchestra with Sam Amidon

Sam Amidon

Classical music mastermind Pekka Kuusisto teams with the Australian Chamber Orchestra and American folkster Sam Amidon for a series of shows titled Murder Redemption

Saturday 4th February – Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 5th February – Hamer Hall, Melbourne, VIC
Monday 6th February – Hamer Hall, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 7th February – Adelaide Town Hall, Adelaide, SA
Wednesday 8th February – City Recital Hall, Sydney, NSW
Friday 10th February – City Recital Hall, Sydney, NSW

Gigs Next Week

1x1x1 feat. Timothy Nelson, Helen Shanahan, Joel Barker, Jacob Diamond and Billie Rogers
Saturday 4th February – Fringe World, Fremantle Town Hall, Fremantle, WA

Alanna Eileen w/ Brendon Moon
Thursday 9th February – The Newsagency, Sydney, NSW

Amanda Palmer
Friday 3rd February – Melt Festival, Powerhouse, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 4th February – Melt Festival, Powerhouse, Brisbane, QLD
Friday 10th February – MONA, Hobart, TAS

Andy Irvine w/ Luke Plumb
Friday 3rd February – House Concert, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 4th February – The Tablelands Community Centre, Ruffy, VIC
Sunday 5th February – Duckpond House Concert, Healesville, VIC
Thursday 11th February – House Concert, Harcourt North, VIC

Beecroft Bushdance feat. Currawong Bush Band
Saturday 4th February – Beecroft Community Centre, Sydney, NSW

Courtyard Sessions Presents BUOY
Friday 3rd February – Seymour Centre, Sydney, NSW

Courtyard Sessions Presents Frank Sultana
Friday 10th February – Seymour Centre, Sydney, NSW

eüsh
Friday 3rd February – Phoenix Rising Cafe, Nimbin, NSW
Saturday 4th February – Treehouse On Belongil, Byron Bay, NSW
Sunday 5th February – The Farm Byron Bay, Byron Bay, NSW
Thursday 9th February – Slyfox, Sydney, NSW

Fanny Lumsden
Friday 3rd February – Country Rocks’ Braidwood Servicemens Club, Braidwood, NSW

Folkswagon feat. Bill Hunt, Willowy, Liam Gale & the Ponytails
Wednesday 8th February – Cafe Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Hat Fitz & Cara
Friday 3rd February – The J, Noosa, QLD
Saturday 4th February – The New Globe Theatre, Brisbane, QLD
Sunday 5th February – Nimbin Bush Theatre, Nimbin, NSW

Heartbreaker Sessions feat. Skyscraper Stan, Lisa Caruso
Sunday 5th February – The Bearded Tit, Sydney, NSW

Hootenanny feat. Grizzlee Train
Sunday 5th February – Miss Peaches, Sydney, NSW

James Taylor w/ Kasey Chambers, Bernard Fanning
Thursday 9th February – Botanic Park, Adelaide, SA

James Thomson & The Starnge Pilgrims, Andy Golledge Band
Sunday 5th February – Marrickville Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW

Jess Locke w/ Shiny Coin
Friday 3rd February – The Haunt, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 4th February – The Foundry, Brisbane, QLD
Sunday 5th February – 4zzz Carpark, Brisbane, QLD

Kasey Chambers w/ Thelma Plumb
Friday 10th February – Taronga Zoo, Mosman, NSW

Kenta Hayashi
Sunday 5th February – Sooki Lounge, Melbourne, VIC

Lior
Thursday 9th February – Camelot Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Lucie Thorne & The Yearlings
Friday 10th February – Bella Union, Melbourne, VIC

Mat McHugh
Friday 3rd February – The Northshore Tavern, Hillarys, WA
Saturday 4th February – Mojo’s, Fremantle, WA
Sunday 5th February – Caves House Hotel, Yallingup, WA

Merry Muse feat. The Lowlands
Sunday 5th January – Canberra Irish Club, Canberra, ACT

Miriam Liberman
Saturday 4th February – Church On The Hill, Bendigo, VIC
Sunday 5th February – Caravan Music Club, Melbourne, NSW
Friday 10th February – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Mitch Power w/ Jen Mize
Friday 3rd February – Two Goats Cafe, Armidale, NSW
Saturday 4th February – Rambling Nights, Django Bar, Sydney, NSW
Sunday 5th February – House Concert, Maitland, NSW
Wednesday 8th to Friday 10th February – Sungold Field Days Festival, Warrnambool, VIC

Moonshine Grooves feat. Craig Woodward & The Lonely Dogs, Tenderfoot, Johnny Romeo & The Big Love
Friday 3rd February – The Hideaway Bar, Sydney, NSW

Paddy McHugh & Browny
Friday 3rd February – The Bearded Lady, Brisbane, QLD

Passenger
Saturday 4th February – Freo Arts Centre, Fremantle, WA

Pekka Kuusisto and the Australian Chamber Orchestra with Sam Amidon
Saturday 4th February – Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 5th February – Hamer Hall, Melbourne, VIC
Monday 6th February – Hamer Hall, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 7th February – Adelaide Town Hall, Adelaide, SA
Wednesday 8th February – City Recital Hall, Sydney, NSW
Friday 10th February – City Recital Hall, Sydney, NSW

Picking in the Park
Sunday 5th February – Banjo Patterson Park, Sydney, NSW

Ramblin’ Nights Post Tamworth Party feat. Lachlan Bryan, Mitch Power, Jen Mize, Peasant Moon
Saturday 5th February – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Skyscraper Stan
Friday 3rd February – The Front Gallery, Canberra, ACT
Sunday 5th February – The Bearded Tit, Sydney, NSW

Sweet Jelly Rolls
Sunday 5th February – Shady Pines, Sydney, NSW

The Backsliders
Saturday 4th February – Tuggeranong Arts Centre, Canberra, ACT

The Bean Project w/ Burrows
Friday 3rd February – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT

The Beaut Utes, The Roadside Ashes, Roland Kay Smith
Sunday 5th February – Petersham Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW

The Cat Empire & Xavier Rudd
Saturday 4th February – Red Devil Park, Byron Bay, NSW
Sunday 5th February – Sandstone Point, Bribie Island, QLD

The Jimmy Davis Duo w/ Luke Escombe
Friday 10th February – The Acoustic Picnic, Sydney, NSW

The McClymonts
Friday 3rd February – The Juniors, Kingsford, NSW
Saturday 4th February – Revesby Workers, Revesby, NSW
Thursday 9th February – Bairnsdale RSL, Bairnsdale, VIC
Friday 10th February – Village Green Hotel, Mulgrave, VIC

The Morrisons
Friday 10th February – Franks Wild Years, Thirroul, NSW

The Porch Sessions feat. Winterbourne, Riley Pearce, Alice Haddy
Friday 5th February – House Concert, Adelaide, SA

The Spooky Men’s Chorale
Friday 3rd February – Orange Regional Convervatorium, Orange, NSW
Saturday 4th February – BMEC, Bathurst, NSW

The Timbers
Thursday 9th February – South Coast Folk Club, Port Noarlunga, SA

Tom Stephens
Thursday 9th February – Golden Age Cinema and Bar, Sydney, NSW

Tori Forsyth
Friday 3rd February – Lizottes, Newcastle, NSW
Saturday 4th February – Rooty Hill, Sydney, NSW

Waiting for Guinness
Saturday 4th February – Camelot Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Willing Ponies
Sunday 5th February – The Union, Sydney, NSW

Winterbourne
Friday 3rd February – SUB Beanbag Gigs, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 4th February – Workers Club, Geelong, VIC
Sunday 5th February – Porch Sessions, Adelaide, SA
Thursday 9th February – The Front, Canberra, ACT
Friday 10th February – Rad, Wollongong, NSW

Friday Folk Flashback

“Ruby” – The Morrisons

Can you tell we’re excited for The Morrisons’ debut album on Monday?

Davidson Brothers Announce Eighth Studio Album

Davidson Brothers
Image Courtesy of Davidson Brothers

Over the weekend legendary Australian bluegrass duo Davidson Brothers were inducted into the Australian Country Music Hall of Fame as part of the Tamworth Country Music Festival.

“It’s an absolute honour to be permanently recoginsed alongside some of the most influential artists in Australian music history,” Hamish Davidson said at the time.

While the Davidson Brothers were literally cementing themselves in Australian country music history they also found time to announce details of their highly anticipated eighth studio album All You Need Is Music.

The album, which is due for release on the 7th April, was recorded in Nashville last December.

“Recording this time around has been a particularly exciting process, getting to work with a wider group of musicians which allowed us to cover a broader range of styles that we haven’t attempted on previous albums,” explained Lachlan Davidson.

There’s bound to be a tour to support All You Need Is Music – stay tuned for details!

Ten Artists to Watch in the First Half of 2017

Bob Dylan

With the new year upon us it’s time to look ahead at some of the great folk, roots and acoustic music that will be coming our way in 2017. And it’s already shaping up to be an amazing year with a bunch of very exciting albums already announced (see the list at the bottom of this piece) and even more in the works. We had a stab at picking 10 artists we think you should be keeping an eye on in the coming months but as always this is far from exhaustive. We hope you enjoy and a happy 2017!

All Our Exes All Our Exes Live in Texas

A perennial for this yearly article it would seem. Somewhere in between tour commitments last year All Our Exes Live in Texas found time to get into the studio and record their debut album When We Fall. The album was produced and engineered by Wayne Connolly (Sarah Blasko, Silverchair, You Am I) and will likely hit stores around March. Expect to see a lot of All Our Exes Live in Texas in the coming months – they’re set to explode.

Davidson Brothers Davidson Brothers

Late last year Australian bluegrass duo Davidson Brothers headed to Nashville to record with Larry Marrs at Mark Thornton for an upcoming album. The Davidson Brothers released their last album Wanderlust back in 2014 so a new record is very much anticipated and if you’ve managed to catch them live yet this year you’ll know they continue to be one of the most exciting live acts in the country. Stay tuned for news of their new album soon!

Fleet Foxes

While there’s been no official announcement of a new Fleet Foxes album this year, their first since 2011’s Helplessness Blues, all signs are pointing toward a release very soon. Frontman Robin Pecknold has been hinting at a new Fleet Foxes long player (plus a solo album) over the last couple of months and the band also reassured fans via social media that they wouldn’t have to fly to an announced show in Ireland in July because “we’ll be doing a full world tour in 2017-18 so no need to spend a lot on travel”. Watch this space for more information when it’s announced!

Husky Husky

Don’t be surprised if Husky’s 2016 single “Late Night Store” makes an appearance in this year’s triple j Hottest 100 – the national youth broadcaster has been hammering it of late. The track is the first taster from the Melbourne indie-folk duo’s third album which is due for release at “some point” in 2017. That’s all the information we have now but expect some more news to drop soon.

Jordan Jordan Ireland

The ex-member of The Middle East announced plans to release his new album Jordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra on the 20th January. The first track from the album “East Coaster” is a lot more acoustically driven than Ireland’s previous project Stolen Violin, but that’s not to say the rest of Jordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra will follow suit. We’ll have to wait and see what the album brings but I have a feeling it’s going to be something special.

Laura marling Laura Marling

A new album from Laura Marling in 2017 – Semper Femina due on the 10th March – is in itself not a surprise. The prolific singer-songwriter has released five albums over the last nine years with Semper Femina marking her sixth long player. But on hearing the first single “Soothing” it’s clear that Marling is experimenting with her sound and Semper Femina may not be as “folk” as we’re used to from her. The album will apparently focus heavily on female characters and creativity, a theme Laura Marling explored in her excellent 2016 podcast Reversal of the Muse which we highly recommend you download.

Punch Brothers Punch Brothers Side Projects

While things are pretty quiet on the Punch Brothers front the various members are keeping themselves very very busy. As well as hosting the new season of A Prairie Home Companion mandolinist and singer Chris Thile will release his album with jazz pianist Brad Mehldau, Chris Thile & Brad Mehldau, on the 27th January. Banjo player Noam Pikelny’s new solo album Universal Favorite is due for release in March this year and was produced by Punch Brothers fiddle player Gabe Witcher. Witcher has also produced a solo album for guitarist Chris “Critter” Eldridge which will hopefully come out this year. Bassist Paul Kowert is prepping a new album as well with his trio Haas Kowert Tice (featuring Brittany Haas and Jordan Tice). All in all this might be the biggest year ever for fans of Punch Brothers.


Rhiannon Giddens Rhiannon Giddens

With her new album Freedom Highway due on the 24th February and an Australian tour this April (including an appearance at Bluesfest), 2017 could well be the year Rhiannon Giddens solidifies her Australian fanbase. Freedom Highway delves deep into black American history with songs based on slave narratives of the 19th century through to the civil rights movements of the 1960s. This may be Giddens’s most powerful work to date.

The Morrisons The Morrisons

There was a time when you couldn’t move in Sydney without bumping into a gig from The Morrisons. But over the last 18 months or so The Morrisons have become a little more scarce as the members focus on their side projects, although they continue to shine with their Paul Kelly and O Brother Where Art Thou? theme shows. In recent months the band have started posting photos from the studio and as we write this it looks like The Morrisons are on the verge of announcing the release of their debut album and a bunch of tour dates – 2017 is going to be the year The Morrisons come back in a big bad way.

Timberwolf Timberwolf

Adelaide based indie-folk singer-songwriter Timberwolf has been quietly plugging away at the scene for a while now and I feel as though 2017 will be his year. Having already garnered attention from triple j for his new single “Washed Out” Timberwolf is about to release his debut album and has a bunch of tour dates through the end of January and the start of February. Once the album is announced expect to see Timberwolf through 2017.

2017 Album Release Schedule

6th January: 11 Short Stories Of Pain & Glory – Dropkick Murphys
13th January: Gentlewoman, Ruby Man – Flo Morrissey & Matthew E. White
13th January: Laws of Gravity – The Infamous Stringdusters
13th January: Endless – The McClymonts
20th January: Jordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra – Jordan Ireland With Purple Orchestra
20th January: Dragonfly – Kasey Chambers
27th January: Chris Thile & Brad Mehldau – Chris Thile & Brad Mehldau
27th January: Seven Long Years – Musketeer
27th January: Stitch of the World – Tift Merritt
3rd February: Big Machine – Eliza Carthy and The Wayward Band
10th February: Memories Are Now – Jesca Hoop
10th February: Best Of – Old Crow Medicine Show
17th February: Windy City – Alison Krauss
17th February: Postcards From The Shell House – Busby Marou
17th February: Life Will See You Now – Jens Lekman
17th February: Highway Queen – Nikki Lane
17th February: Prisoner – Ryan Adams
24th February: Freedom Highway – Rhiannon Giddens
27th February: Common as Light and Love Are Red Valleys of Blood – Sun Kil Moon
March – Universal Favorite – Noam Pikelny
3rd March: When We Fall – All Our Exes Live In Texas
3rd March: Ironbark – The Waifs
10th March: Semper Femina – Laura Marling
16th March: The Order of Time – Valerie June
31st March: Life Love Flesh Blood – Imelda May

The Gum Ball Reveals Full Lineup

Davidson Brothers
Image Courtesy of Davidson Brothers

The Gum Ball festival in the Hunter Valley, NSW holds a special place in our hearts. It is one of the country’s best boutique festivals, attracting an amazing lineup of artists to a beautiful, intimate setting.

The first round of artists for the festival, including the likes of Jeff Lang, Suzannah Espie and Caitlin Park, was announced right before Christmas, and now the full lineup has been revealed.

Joining an already impressive list of artists will be William Crighton, Devon Sproule, Davidson Brothers (above), Grace Turner, Galleri and many more.

The Gum Ball is held at Dashville, NSW from the 22nd to 24th April. Check out the full list of artists below:

You Am I
Dan Sultan
Jeff Lang
The Cactus Channel
Van Walker’s HeartBrokers
Citizen Kay
Dan Brodie
Bullhorn
Suzannah Espie
Polish Club
Caitlin Park
Astro Travellers
The Buzzard Mix
The Break
The Belligerents
Kristin Hersh (USA)
Sex on Toast
William Crighton
Devon Sproule (USA)
Davidson Brothers
Dashville Progress Society
Baghead
Mucho Sonar
Grace Turner
Dr Peach
Galleri
The Breakfast Club
OKA

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