Foy Vance Announces New Album The Wild Swan

Foy Vance
Image Courtesy of Foy Vance

Irish singer-songwriter Foy Vance has just announced plans to drop a brand new album The Wild Swan. The album will hit stores on the 13th May and will feature the gorgeous new acoustic single “She Burns” – take a listen below:

National Folk Festival Interview: Burrows

Burrows
Image Courtesy of Burrows

You may recognise the members of Canberra nu-folk four piece Burrows as being from bands like The Ellis Collective, Mr Fibby, Fun Machine, Pocket Fox and more. But Burrows is more than the sum of its parts, with music that draws you in and captivates you. With a new album on the way Burrows will be playing a series of shows at this week’s National Folk Festival. We sat down with front man and songwriter Sam King to talk through the evolution of the band.

Gareth Hugh Evans: Back in 2013 you were on The National Folk Festival lineup credited as Sam King. Was that the beginning of the project that has become Burrows?

Sam King: Yeah, it actually was! I applied to the festival solo because I’d not really done much solo before, I’d always played in bands. I had a solid hour of songs at that point so I thought I’d give it a shot. Then very kind of close to the festival I decided that it’s definitely much more fun playing with other people so I invited three people to come and play with me. We were still credited as “Sam King” in the festival program. It was only meant to be a one off thing, a nice excuse to play with some friends. But we ended up being quite taken by it and continued doing it.

GHE: I was at The National that year and called you out as an artist to watch in a Timber and Steel feature. And then every now and then I’d check in online to see what was going to happen to “Sam King” project but nothing had ever eventuated. I thought maybe that was it – I didn’t realise it had evolved into what has now become Burrows.

SK: Yeah – it’s a slightly less Google-able name

GHE: All of you guys play in different bands in and around the Canberra folk and indie scene like The Ellis Collective and Mr Fibby. What makes Burrows different from those other projects?

SK: Yeah, a lot of those bands have the same people in them. We definitely stick pretty close to each other project to project. I mean Grahame [Thompson] is definitely my go to cello guy. They all kind of evolved out of different things. For The Ellis Collective Matty Ellis is a huge part of that. The name we were never really stoked with but it kind of came about because early on there was a lot of us playing in the band and we were all quite busy. It was more just an idea that Matty could be at the centre and whoever he was playing with could be The Ellis Collective. As it turned out we pretty much all made it to all gigs so it wasn’t really necessary. For [Burrows] I’m sort of at the centre of it. I’m slightly uncomfortable with that idea but I like to think of it as a more collaborative process than just a single singer-songwriter. I feel like we’re much more than the sum of our parts from that point of view. So I guess what makes it different from the other projects is really that I’m playing less of a supportive role – usually the catalyst for all the songs comes from me and then it evolves from there pretty quickly.

GHE: And it’s not just you doing the songwriting right? I got the feeling other members of the band were contributing.

SK: Yeah. And that’s a great deal for me. Usually the way those songs come about is often I’ll get a third of a way through a song – I might have a melody and the chords – and I sort of take it as far as I can then flick it to them. Whether they totally finish it from there or they flick it back to me, that process can go on for a little bit – but in most cases I’ll get it part of the way and they’ll write the lyrics, then maybe as a band we’ll change things structurally. I’d really love in the future for it to be much more collaborative. After a while you get sick of the sound of yourself.

GHE: So you’re just about done on the Burrows album right? You’re pretty close to releasing that?

SK: Yeah, it’s being pressed and printed now. It will be available at The National Folk Festival but we’re not officially launching it – it’s just a little sneaky prelaunch. I think we’ll be officially launching it and touring it mid year. Our initial plan was to launch it at the festival and then tour it around that time but it had to get pushed back a little bit – I was al little bit too picky with the masters. It came back the first time and I wasn’t thrilled with the mix, I had to change one or two things.

GHE: I caught you guys at the Summer Hills Folk Festival in Sydney and from what I gather you pretty much played the album from start to finish in your set there.

SK: Yeah, that’s right.

GHE: It’s sounding gorgeous live. I guess the way I would describe Burrows’ sound is “lean in music”. The kind of music you want to listen intently to.

SK: That’s a very good description – that’s definitely what we’re aiming for. We’re trying to be miles away from the play-louder-than-the-pub kind of band, which I’ve definitely done in the past but it gets kind of exhausting. These days we hope to invite people in rather than try to compete with them.

GHE: Are you playing more intimate stages at The National Folk Festival?

SK: Generally The National’s pretty great for [that type of music]. We’re playing Scrumpy, Majestic and The Lyric – we’ve just got the three gigs. Intimate is what we’ll be aiming for and we’ll cross our fingers that there won’t be some sort of dance band in the next tent.

GHE: Just as you’re launching into a sweet folk tune the Brass Knuckle Brass Band will march past.

SK: Those guys would do that just to spite me, even if they weren’t scheduled to play at that point they’d hop up on stage [laughs]. The festival tends to evolve every year with where venues are and the size of them. Scrumpy and Majestic have been pretty consistent over the last few years.

GHE: I feel like The Majestic is your spiritual home. That’s always traditionally been the “youth” tent at the festival.

SK: Yeah. There’s a very funny story behind The Majestic. The two years before The Majestic came about and was on the oval Mr Fibby was there. We didn’t get in [to the program] but we were all there with The Ellis Collective and I think [Adam] Hadley was there with something. – we just put up some posters in toilets saying “Mr Fibby. The Oval. 10pm”. So there was a tradition for a couple of years where we would play acoustically on the oval and sometimes more people than could really hear us would show up, which is awesome. And then the Majestic was kind of put there based on those performances. I think the festival director had been invited to come down and look at these scallywags playing on the oval and then they put Hadley in charge of the venue for three years. Then hilariously we couldn’t get a gig there anymore [laughs]. But yeah, definitely our spiritual homeland based on that. It was brought about by Mr Fibby in an indirect way – and it also coincided with the fringe festival’s funding getting diverted to The National. It was nice to see all that stuff in one place – it was often hard to get a seat in there.

GHE: Definitely – when The Majestic was on the oval I could never get in. People would just come and park themselves there all day.

SK: Yeah – it was funny wasn’t it? I would always just sneak backstage and watch from there.

GHE: As a Canberra based band how important is The National Folk Festival for you guys?

SK: It’s definitely a great opportunity to play in Canberra to a lot of people who are from interstate. I think it’s a good stepping-stone – it’s a nice gateway for other festivals around the place. A lot of the other festival directors come to The National and they see you and that has some nice flow on effects. And I guess as a Canberran, I’ve not done anything else for Easter since I was 17. I’m sure other stuff goes on but I wouldn’t know about it. It’s a very special time of year and it’s always very nice when they get you along to play – particularly when I was younger. The first few breaks they gave me in bands like One Night Jam – they were hugely supportive. For younger performers it’s a great stepping-stone to all of a sudden be playing to 200 people who are hanging on your every word. There’s not really any opportunities in Canberra – or anywhere to for that matter – to do that outside of the festivals. I cannot praise it highly enough.

GHE: Well thank you so much for chatting with me today. I can’t wait to see Burrows again!

SK: Thanks very much mate.

All of Burrows’ shows at The National Folk Festival are below:

Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
– Saturday 5pm – Scrumpy
– Sunday 10:30pm – The Lyric
– Monday 4pm – Majestic

Jake Bugg Announces New Album On My Own

Jake Bugg
Photo by Sarah Turier

English singer-songwriter Jake Bugg has announced plans to release his brand new album On My Own on the 17th June.

The album will feature 11 new songs from Bugg and features the singer-songwriter on most of the instruments, producing most of the album.

The first single from On My Own is “Gimme The Love”. Take a listen to the song and check out the full track listing below:

1. On My One
2. Gimme The Love
3. Love, Hope and Misery
4. The Love We’re Hoping For
5. Put Out The Fire
6. Never Wanna Dance
7. Bitter Salt
8. Ain’t No Rhyme
9. Livin’ Up Country
10. All That
11. Hold On You

Watch the New Ariela Jacobs Video “Lost”

Ariela Jacobs
Image Courtesy of Ariela Jacobs

Melbourne based singer-songwriter Ariela Jacobs has just released her brand new video for the track “Lost”. The single is taken from her recently released EP Yesteryear.

“”Lost” for me defines a two-way street,” Jacobs explains. “On the one hand, it’s about being vulnerable in a relationship considered to be toxic and on the other it’s about the confinements of sexuality and identity. I wrote “Lost” when I was 19. I had just come out to my family, and although they were open in their views, I was dealing with an internal conflict of being both queer and Jewish, an integration of two minorities in one. I wanted the video to portray that as much as possible. And although it came across quite ambiguously, I think the video clip did a beautiful job of showing these two respective parts.”

Check out the video for “Lost” below:

National Folk Festival Interview: Sian Evans

Sian Evans
Image Courtesy of Sian Evans

Brisbane based singer-songwriter Sian Evans hits The National Folk Festival for the first time this weekend as part of her current east coast tour. We caught up with Sian Evans to discuss her new sound, the stresses of being a touring artist and what we can expect from her performances at The National.

Gareth Hugh Evans: You’ve just released your new single “Cold Feet”. I love it – there’s a pop sensibility about it while still maintaining your folk and country roots. It feels like you’ve written a pop song.

Sian Evans: I did write a pop song. I wanted it to be accessible to a wider audience. I wrote three songs last year and that was one of them – they all kind of have this pop sensibility. At the moment my head is in a space of wanting to write singles and then maybe put out an album full of singles. I really want to work on something that’s really bloody awesome and that I’m really really proud of. I feel like I’ve got the maturity to actually deliver something like that whereas when I did an album years and years ago I just so wasn’t there as a song writer yet.

GHE: Is part of it to separate the solo work from your work with The Rusty Datsuns?

SE: I guess so, yeah. A lot of people didn’t really know who any of the The Rusty Datsuns were individually anyway so I’ve started from scratch. The stuff that we wrote is different to where I’m at at the moment. My last record was more traditionally focused – it had one song on it that was mine and a bit pop. And I guess after you’ve been slogging at it for ten years you want stuff that’s going to be favoured by radio stations [laughs]. It’s not all about the financial side of things, it’s not all about money or anything like that. Anyone who comes into the the music industry with the idea of making money, unless they’re doing pub covers, then they’re absolute idiots. But to just have it sailing its own ship at some point, or maybe getting the closest that I’ve ever been, would be really nice.

GHE: And I guess if you’re performing under your own name it’s music that represents you as an individual.

SE: Yeah, totally. I’ve never been very good at themed writing – I’m pretty authentic to the cause and whatever mood I may be in. To some extent I’m probably a bit of a sad person [laughs] – it reflects in my music.

GHE: I really like the production on “Cold Feet” as well. I think that might contribute to why I think it’s a pop song – it’s really tight.

SE: [Producer] Josh Shuberth used to drum for Josh Pyke and I love Josh Pyke, I’ve been listening to him since I was in high school. I’ve been rolling around with my stampy box and jingles which is basically my broken down drum kit that I play with my feet while I play at the same time because I can’t afford a drummer and because I don’t want to have to deal with another personality. My last record we slapped on our hands and our knees and stamped my boots on the ground – I really like natural sounds. So this time we set my mate Mike in the studio with whatever we could find and there was a hundred different tambourines in the studio and a wine bottle with a spoon – so we just tapped on heaps of shit and again I got into the studio and tapped on my thighs and my stomach and my hands.

GHE: You’ve already played a couple of shows around Brisbane to support “Cold Feet” and you’re about to head out on some east coast dates – are you looking forward to those?

SE: Hell yeah. I’d be playing everywhere if I could afford to but I just decided to stick within my means for this tour which meant not going back to my home town of Cairns and it also meant not going to Melbourne. I had such a great time in WA last year – Perth and Fremantle were just amazing. So that’s kind of sad but I figure maybe I’ll pick up a bit of momentum for the single and I’ll pick up those places for the next tour. But I’m really looking forward to heading down to Canberra – I’ve never actually spent any time in and around Canberra before. And I’ve never been to The National Folk Festival before and it’s the 50th anniversary so if that’s not some kind of sign, I’m not sure what is.

GHE: I think you’re going to absolutely love The National. It’s one of my favourites – it’s a community coming together.

SE: Is that not the nature of these types of festivals? Except it won’t be so hot that you want to keel over and die [laughs].

GHE: Is it just going to be you and your fiddle player at The National?

SE: Yeah! Unless if a friend happens to be going or we happen to meet someone at a jam – by the end of a festival everyone is just like family. If you make special, chemical connections with people you want to share that on stage. If I happen to jam with a bass player or someone else and it works I have no issues with having guests on my stage ever.

GHE: As well as The National you have shows around Queensland and Northern New South Wales as well…

SE: Like Nimbin Mardi Grass!

GHE: I’m not familiar with Nimbin Mardi Grass at all.

SE: I was meant to play there last year but I was supposed to do Urban Country Festival as well. Urban ended up getting cancelled and I made the call not to try to drive to Mardi Grass because it was too sketchy with the weather, as to whether everyone was going to get flooded in or not. I didn’t really need that. But I love Nimbin, and I love the area. It’s just really beautiful – that appeals to me a lot. I’m not a really massive pot smoker so that side of it doesn’t necessarily appeal to me, but if that’s people’s thing that’s fine. But it’s a nice place to go for a couple of nights – it’s nice and cool and there’s generally some really bloody good music.

GHE: You had a pretty massive 2015 in terms of touring. Is 2016 shaping up the same way?

SE: No. Last year I basically just fell apart. It was too much for me – too much back and forth, too much travelling. By the end of it I couldn’t fly without being sedated on valium because I started having panic attacks on aeroplanes.

GHE: That’s not ok!

SE: It was really full on. I was still running a business in Brisbane and trying to get back to my son in Cairns – it was just too much. And touring solo, being on my own for a lot of the time and doing all the driving and lugging in of gear myself, I just felt the camaraderie wasn’t there. I lost so much money as well – I was just banging my head against a wall going “am I really doing the right thing? I really thought my calling was music but maybe I’m not good enough”. So I had to just step back and go this is going to have to be more of a hobby and I decided that I would prefer to definitely work another job and make that a priority as well as being a mum. I would put less pressure on performing and maybe try to do just two tours a year – make them x amount of time long so I didn’t burn myself out and so that I could give my audience the best of myself. And now I’m working full time and I’m totally a single mum in the city with no family at all – so that’s pretty hectic. I just really have to pace myself. I’m touring this time for the majority over the school holidays and mainly weekends for the time outside of that. So that is just a walk in the park. No aeroplanes for Sian!

GHE: Yeah, I know a number of artists where the relentless touring and travelling has led to burn out.

SE: It’s f**ked! There’s no other way to say it for what is often no monetary return. And it should be about quality of life. The way that I was living was not fun at all – I wasn’t happy, I wasn’t enjoying it, I was questioning everything and I was so f**king poor.

GHE: And it pulls the joy out of the music which is why you started in the first place.

SE: Yeah. It’s for self expression and it’s for connection. I was in such a broken place I just felt like I couldn’t look people in the eye at some points without drinking. I was so exhausted all of the time and because I was drinking I didn’t know whether I was tired or I was shitfaced [laughs]. When you get to that point you’ve kind of hit a point of no return and I really needed to take a break. And I did – I took a break for four months and then of course got itchy feet. I was like “ok, I’m going to book another tour now!”. But I tried to be really organised about this one and I started three or four months prior, booking the gigs, and basically didn’t push very hard. I just went with what came really easily and what had money attached to it.

GHE: It sounds like you’ve found a balance now.

SE: Yeah, totally. And I think that that’s the way forward. Approaching it a bit slower – smashing it out and then having a break.

GHE: Definitely sounds like you’re on the right path. Well that’s about all we have time for – thank you so much for chatting with me today. I’m super excited to see you at The National

SE: I can’t wait. Thanks Gareth.

All of Sian Evans’ upcoming tour dates, including her shows at The National Folk Festival are below:

Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
– Friday 9pm – The Lyric
– Saturday 4:50pm – The Buddawang
– Sunday 7:10pm – Spiegel Zelt
Wednesday 6th April – The Foundry, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 9th April – No.5 Church St, Bellingen, NSW
Saturday 16th April Night Quarter, Gold Coast, QLD
Friday 22nd April – Grounded Festival, Brisbane Valley, QLD
Saturday 30th April – Nimbin Mardigrass, Nimbin, NSW
Sunday 1st May – Brisbane Powerhouse, Brisbane, QLD

Watch the New Matthew and the Atlas Video “Temple”

Matthew and the Atlas
Image Courtesy of Matthew and the Atlas

The first single and title track of the upcoming Matthew and the Atlas album Temple, due on the 22nd April, now has a brand new video filmed in Portland Quarry, Dorset, with director Neil Coxhill.

“The concept of the video is playing with how, in a subtle way, small choices can have a large impact on the consequences of our future,” Coxhill explained. “We used time travel and paradox time-lines to communicate how a simple journey can change under the chaos of the moment. As our time-traveler (played by Matthew and The Atlas’ Matt Hegarty) creates a new timeline, the woman seeking him is given the chance to try and save him, again and again.”

Check out “Temple” below:

National Folk Festival Interview: Nancy Kerr

Nancy Kerr
Image Courtesy of Nancy Kerr

The headliner for this year’s National Folk Festival is the irrepressible Nancy Kerr, who will be performing as Nancy Kerr & the Sweet Visitor Band, Nancy Kerr & James Fagan and as part of The Fagans. We sat down with Kerr ahead of the festival to chat about what we can expect from her performances at The National.

Gareth Hugh Evans: You’ve played The National Folk Festival a number of times – how does it feel to be headlining the 50th anniversary with your various projects?

Nancy Kerr: Obviously I’m absolutely honoured that the festival has made it possible to bring the band and the family out to Australia. I have been away for three years and it’s been a big time for me so I can’t wait to present our new repertoire and sounds, as well as familiar pieces from the duo’s history, to what I know is an incredible audience to play for.

GHE: In terms of folk festivals around the world how does The National rate?

NK: I think what makes The National special for me is the way it homages and appreciates the raw, grass roots qualities of folk and traditional music, presenting it all with great respect on both big and small stages. The level of knowledge, friendliness and depth with which the audience throws itself into proceedings is second to none, at least as far as I’ve experienced at festivals around the world.

GHE: You’ve found “fame” (if there is such a thing in the folk scene) in your native UK but over the years you’ve spent a lot of time in Australia touring and performing at festivals. What is it about Australia that keeps you coming back (apart from the obvious)?

NK: Well it may be obvious but it’s also true! James [Fagan] and I have been together for 20 years now – or do you mean the weather? Australia is a huge part of my history musically, culturally and in terms of family. A British colleague of mine recently returned from her first trip to Aus and said to me “Ah, I understand you now – you’re Australian!” The subjects of many of my songs will be more current and recognizable here than they are at home in the UK. It’ll be so nice not to have to explain what a Jacaranda is.

GHE: You’re well known for involving yourself in numerous projects – is collaboration an important part of your art?

NK: It’s always been central and that’s why it took me until I was nearly 40 to make my debut solo recording – I think collaboration is the source of so much musical learning and strength but I also think it’s important to step into the light on your own terms sometimes – that way the listener gets to experience everything you’re capable of and things stay fresh and creative.

GHE: After The National what’s next for Nancy Kerr?

NK: My album Instar is nearly finished – the follow-up to Sweet Visitor and also self-written – and I’m delighted with how the band sounds on it – it’s released in September. I have tours with all my projects including a trio with Martin Simpson and Andy Cutting [Simpson·Cutting·Kerr], and I will also be recording and performing political songwriting collaboration “Sweet Liberties” which was commissioned by the Houses of Parliament.

The full list of shows for Nancy Kerr at The National Folk Festival are below:

Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – The National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
Nancy Kerr & the Sweet Visitor Band:
– Friday 7pm – Buddawang
– Sunday 8pm – Marquee
– Monday 4:40pm – Buddawang
Nancy Kerr & James Fagan
– Saturday 8pm – Flute ‘n’ Fiddle
– Sunday 10:50am – Buddawang
The Fagans:
– Saturday 10:40am – Buddawang
– Monday 12pm – Marquee

Watch the New Julia Jacklin Video “Pool Party”

Julia Jacklin
Image Courtesy of Julia Jacklin

Sydney based singer-songwriter Julia Jacklin continues her upward trajectory with the release of her new single and video “Pool Party”. The track comes ahead of Jacklin’s upcoming appearance at SXSW before she heads out on an Australian tour.

Check out full list of dates and the video for “Pool Party” below:

Friday 29th April – Junk Bar, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 30th April – Shebeen, Melbourne, VIC
Sunday 1st May – Grace Emily, Adelaide, SA
Saturday 14th May – Plan B, Sydney, NSW

Thank Folk It’s Friday – 18th March

TFIF

This Week in Folk

All the News From The Week That Was

– Singer songwriter William Crighton released his new single “Priest” from his brand new, self titled album. Details here

– St Patrick’s Day may have been yesterday but The Gaelic Club in Sydney is still celebrating with a session tonight, The Button Collective tomorrow night and a film on Sunday. Details here

– Canadian songstress Ann Vriend is currently touring Australia. Details here

– Sydney band Bears With Guns released their new single “Let Go”. Details here

– Newcastle based alt-country duo The Wayward Henrys released their new video “Early Grave”. Details here

– Alice Springs based singer-songwriter Colin Lillie released his new video “Give Thanks”. Details here

Radical Face released “The Ship In Port” ahead of his album release next week. Details here

– Sydney bluegrassers The Buffalo Grass Boys released their new video “Lonely Nights”. Details here

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros released their new video “No Love Like Yours”. Details here

– Canadian prog-folk band Jaron Freeman-Fox & The Opposite of Everything have announced Australian tour dates. Details here

Daniel Champagne has announced a massive Australian tour through March and April. Details here

– Brisbane based singer-songwriter Sian Evans released her new single “Cold Feet”. Details here

Bon Iver announce that they’re returning to Australia as part of Vivid Sydney this year. Details here

Passenger, All Our Exes Live In Texas and Luke Thompson shared a live version of “Caravan”. Details here

Interviews

“We’ve just recorded our third album of thirteen original tracks, some of which you’d call bluegrass and some of which I don’t know what you’d call it. But it’s all great music and we’ve pulled it off – it’s a really fun band in that respect” – George Jackson from The Company chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“We started playing music together as friends and then came across the Bluegrass and Old Time Society and started going there a lot. We’d learn three songs to play at that gig – every month we’d learn three more songs. And we slowly built up a set and we ended up having enough to do a gig on our own. It was pretty slow but also really nice” – John Healy and Francis Duffy from The Plough chat to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“For the 1979 National Festival, which was in Melbourne, one of the reasons Bloodwood got together in the first place was to promote the 1980 festival which was to be held in Alice Springs. We went down there and had a fabulous reception. We had terrific posters and terrific t-shirts and all that stuff designed by a lady in Alice Springs. It was a knock out design and the strange thing is we were actually asked to stop promoting the 1980 festival by the Melbourne organisers because no one was buying their t-shirts. That is deadset true!” – Bob Barford from Bloodwood chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

“I have a deep relationship with Scottish music, as I spent one year of my life in Glasgow, to absorb the music from its source. The music can be really gentle and smooth, when it comes to ballads but also really ferocious and rythmically driving in strathspeys or reels – I really like the broad spectrum of expression and energy when it comes to Scottish Music” – Paul Dangl from Black Market Tune chats to Gareth Hugh Evans. Interview here

Releases This Week

William Crighton
William CrightonWilliam Crighton
iTunes

Way Down South
Way Down SouthJoe Mungovan
iTunes

Timber and Steel Presents

The Timbers

William Fitzsimmons

Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Timber and Steel Recommends – Go To This Gig

Bloodwood

Bloodwood

Seminal Australian bush band Bloodwood have reformed for The National Folk Festival next week and are performing two shows in their hometown of Alice Springs in preparation. If you’re in either of Australia’s Territories this week these are gigs not to be missed.

Friday 18th March – The Watertank Cafe, Alice Springs, NT
Saturday 19th March – The Watertank Cafe, Alice Springs, NT
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Gigs Next Week

Adam Young w/ Den Hanrahan, Not Good With Horses
Saturday 19th March – Marrickville Bowling Club, Sydney, NSW

Ann Vriend
Tuesday 22nd March – The Toff, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 25th March – The Goulburn Club, Goulburn, NSW

April Maze
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Black Market Tune
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Yacandandah Folk Festival, Yackandandah, VIC
Monday 21st – Kedron State High School Auditorium, Brisbane, QLD
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Blind Boys of Alabama
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

Bloodwood
Friday 18th March – The Watertank Cafe, Alice Springs, NT
Saturday 19th March – The Watertank Cafe, Alice Springs, NT
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Blue Mountains Music Festival
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Katoomba, NSW

Blue Mts Festival Hillbilly Fringe
Saturday 19th March – Old City Bank, Katoomba, NSW

Bluesfest
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Byron Bay, NSW

Bob Barford
Sunday 20th March – Ooraminna Supper Club, Ooraminna, NT

Broadie Bunker Benefit
Wednesday 23rd March – Coogee Diggers, Sydney, NSW

Brunswick Music Festival
Tuesday 15th to Sunday 20th March – Melbourne, VIC

Daniel Champagne
Friday 18th March – Mountain Mumma, Sheffield, TAS
Saturday 19th March – The Royal Oak Hotel – Boat Shed, LauncestonTAS
Sunday 20th March – Marakoopa Cafe, Mayberry, TAS

Davidson Brothers
Saturday 19th March – Terang Country Music Festival, VIC

Emily Barker
Friday 18th March – Margaret River Cultural Centre, Margaret River, WA
Sunday 20th March – The Bakehouse, Melbourne, VIC
Monday 21st March – Sun Theatre, Yarraville, VIC
Tuesday 22nd March – Brighton Up Bar, Sydney, NSW

Festival of Small Halls feat. Vishtèn, The Little Stevies, Rob Longstaff
Friday 18th March – Willaura Memorial Hall, Willaura, VIC
Saturday 19th March – Dalgety Hall, Dalgety, NSW
Sunday 20th March – Murrah Hall, Murrah, NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Folkswagon feat. Leroy Lee, The Delta Revue, Carlos Arango
Wednesday 23rd March – Cafe Lounge, Sydney, NSW

Gaelic Club Session
Friday 18th March – The Gaelic Club, Sydney, NSW

Goin’ Back – Moreland’s History in Song feat. Jeff Lang, Alison Ferrier, Tracy McNeil, Luke Sinclair, Van Walker, Gretta Ray, Mandy Connell
Friday 18th March – Metanoia Theatre at The Mechanic’s Institute, Melbourne, VIC

Gordie Tentrees
Friday 18th to Monday 21st March – Yachandandah Folk Festival, Yachandandah VIC
Wednesday 23rd March – Murrah Hall, Murrah NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Heartbreaker Sessions feat. The Sweet Jelly Rolls, Whiskey Jeff
Thursday 24th March – Freda’s, Sydney, NSW

Holler & Haul’s Backyard Picnic feat. The Button Collective, Rebecca Bastoli, Grace Turner
Sunday 20th March – House Concert, Sydney, NSW

Hootenanny feat. Echo Deer
Sunday 20th March – Miss Peaches, Sydney, NSW

Hussy Hicks
Saturday 19th March – Nukara Festival, WA
Friday 25th to Sunday 27th March – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

Imogen Clark
Thursday 24th March – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

Irish Mythen
Wednesday 23rd March – Enmore Theatre, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 24th March – Enmore Theatre, Sydney, NSW

Irish Trad Workshops
Friday 18th March – The Gaelic Club, Sydney

James Thomson w/ Ruby Boots
Friday 18th March – Newtown Social Club, Sydney, NSW

Jaron Freeman-Fox & The Opposite of Everything
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Music Festival, Katoomba, NSW
Tuesday 22nd March – Araluen Gold Concert Series, Araluen, NSW
Wednesday 23rd March – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT
Thursday 24th March – The Factory Floor, Sydney, NSW
Friday 25th March – The Spotted Mallard, Melbourne, VIC

Jason Isbell
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, NSW

Jimi Beavis
Friday 18th March – Pistol Pete’s Food ‘n’ Blues, Geelong, VIC
Saturday 19th March – The Retreat Hotel, Melbourne, VIC

Jordie Lane
Friday 18th March – The Gasometer Hotel, Melbourne, VIC
Friday 25th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Kaurna Cronin
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Folk Festival, Katoomba, NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Lachlan Bryan & The Wildes
Saturday 19th March – The Union, Melbourne, VIC

Liam Gerner
Friday 18th March – Flow Bar, Old Bar, NSW
Sunday 20th March – Leftys Old Time Music Hall, Brisbane, QLD

Luke Morris
Saturday 19th March – No. 5 Church St, Bellingen, NSW

Mark Lucas and The Dead Setters
Friday 18th March – The Merton Hotel, Sydney, NSW

Mary Black
Saturday 19th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Folk Festival, NSW

Moxie
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Music Festival, NSW
Wednesday 23rd March – Cat & Fiddle Hotel, Balmain, NSW
Friday 25th March – Fly By Night Club, Fremantle, WA

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, NSW

Patrick James
Friday 18th March – Pirie & Co Social Club, Adelaide, SA
Saturday 19th March – Jimmy’s Den, Perth WA

Pocket Fox
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Ruby Boots
Friday 18th March – Newtown Social Club, Sydney, NSW
Saturday 19th March – The Milk Factory, Brisbane, QLD

Sahara Beck
Sunday 20th March – Bleach Festival, Brisbane, QLD

Sian Evans
Friday 18th March – Queen Street Mall, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 19th March – Peregian Hotel, Peregian Beach, QLD
Saturday 19th March – The Porch Project, Yandina Creek, QLD
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Steve Earle & The Dukes w/ The Mastersons
Friday 18th March – Melbourne Recital Centre, Melbourne, VIC
Saturday 19th March – Melbourne Recital Centre, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 22nd March – Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre, Mackay QLD
Thursday 24th March – Tanks, Cairns, QLD
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

Sturgill Simpson
Tuesday 22nd March – The Metro Theatre, Sydney, NSW **CANCELLED**
Wednesday 23rd March – 170 Russell, Melbourne, VIC **CANCELLED**

The Button Collective
Saturday 19th March – The Gaelic Club, Sydney, NSW

The Decemberists
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, Byron Bay, NSW

The East Pointers
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Yackandandah Folk Festival, Yackandandah, VIC
Wednesday 23rd March – The Toff in Town, Melbourne, VIC
Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

The Little Stevies
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Warrandyte Festival, Warrandyte, VIC
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

The National Anti-Folk Festival
Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT

The National Folk Festival
Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – Canberra, ACT

The Once
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Folk Festival, Katoomba, NSW

The Peninsula Picnic
Sunday 20th March – Mornington Racecourse, Mornington, VIC

The Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band
Saturday 19th March – Courthouse Café, Camperdown, VIC
Sunday 20th March – Burke & Wills Winery, Mia Mia, VIC
Tuesday 22nd March – TBA, Upwey, VIC
Wednesday 23rd March – Valencia Creek Hall, Valencia Creek, VIC
Friday 25th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

The Rambling Boys
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Blue Mountains Music Festival, NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – National Folk Festival, ACT

The Sydney String Band Hootenanny feat. Devil on the Rooftop, Dear Orphans, Squeeze Box Trio, Burnt Creek Deviation
Sunday 20th March – Django Bar, Sydney, NSW

The Timbers
Thursday 24th to Monday 27th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

The Weeping Willows
Friday 18th March – Babushka Bar, Ballarat, VIC
Saturday 19th to Sunday 20th March – The Basin Music Festival, The Basin, VIC
Friday 25th March – Billyroy’s Blues Bar, Bendigo, VIC

The Young’uns
Friday 18th to Friday 20th March – Blue Mountains Music Festival, Katoomba, NSW
Tuesday 22nd March – The Cat and Fiddle, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT

Tim Guy
Friday 18th March – The Bearded Lady, Brisbane, QLD
Saturday 19th March – NightQuarter, Gold Coast, QLD
Sunday 20th March – Melbourne Folk Club, Bakehouse, Melbourne, VIC

Tweedy
Sunday 20th March – Meeniyan Town Hall, Meeniyan, VIC
Monday 21st March – Recital Hall, Melbourne, VIC
Tuesday 22nd March – Factory Theatre, Sydney, NSW
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – Bluesfest, NSW

Yackandandah Folk Festival
Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Yackandandah, VIC

Friday Folk Flashback

“Solsbury Hill” – Peter Gabriel

National Folk Festival Interview: Black Market Tune

Black Market Tune
Image Courtesy of Black Market Tune

Austro-Scottish trad band Black Market Tune return to Australia this month for The National Folk Festival after wowing croweds over the 2014/15 summer. We sat down with fiddle player and singer Paul Dangl to talk through the band’s influences and what Australian audiences can expect from the band this time around.

Gareth Hugh Evans: Black Market Tune draws on a lot of European influences but as you say yourself, the backbone of the band is Scottish. What is it about this music that attracts you?

Paul Dangl: I have a deep relationship with Scottish music, as I spent one year of my life in Glasgow, to absorb the music from its source. The music can be really gentle and smooth, when it comes to ballads but also really ferocious and rythmically driving in strathspeys or reels – I really like the broad spectrum of expression and energy when it comes to Scottish Music.

GHE: When you’re playing music with influences from around Europe what similarities do you see in the way the songs and tunes are constructed?

PD: I found lots of similarities between Austrian and Swedish songs and tunes, both traditions have those driving, fast 3/4 tunes – in Austria they’re called “Schleunige”, in Sweden polskas. Also you find waltzes and polkas all over The European Folk traditions. I find it really interesting to look for similar kind of melodies from different folk traditions, and to combine them.

GHE: You were in Australia just over a year ago for the Woodford Folk Festival – how did you find that experience? What’s brought you back?

PD: We had a great time at Woodford Folk Festival, it was really stunning to see so many types of music and styles of playing in one place called Woodfordia – I think that’s the thing that made it really special, and one reason why we came back – to meet so many musicians, for jamming, chatting and laughing and of course, exchanging music!

GHE: The lineup is a little different from the last time you were here – can you talk us through all of the players in Black Market Tune for the Australian tour?

PD: Box player Colin J Nicholson from Orkney and myself from Austria (fiddle & vocals) were here last year. This year we’re delighted to have Scots singer & fiddle player Lori Watson on board, as well as Graeme Armstrong on guitar. Both musicians hail from the Scottish Borders (South of Scotland), enriching the repertoire of Black Market Tune with great Scots and Borders songs and tunes.

GHE: You’re playing at The National Folk Festival as part of their 50th Anniversary. This festival is well known for it’s jamming and sessions – will we likely see Black Market Tune jamming in the session bar?

PD: Yes, as I mentioned before, the exchange of music is an important aspect of this journey, so it’s very likely you’ll spot some Black Market Tuners around the session bar at any time of the night!

GHE: After your Australian tour what’s next for Black Market Tune?

PD: In May the festival season starts in Europe, and we have a few festivals lined-up so far, among them a very special one where I’ve been founding member – it’s called Wackelstein Festival and it’s from 22nd to 24th of
July, 120km north of Vienna. Our next big project will be our second CD, which will be recorded in Fall 2016 and released on Galileo Records by the beginning of next year.

The upcoming dates for Black Market Tune’s Australian tour, including their shows at The National Folk Festival, are below:

Friday 18th to Sunday 20th March – Yacandandah Folk Festival, VIC
Monday 21st March – Kedron State High School Auditorium, Brisbane, QLD
Thursday 24th to Monday 28th March – National Folk Festival, Canberra, ACT
– Friday 5pm – Marquee
– Saturday 12:50pm – Billy Moran Tent
– Saturday 2:20pm – The Terrace
– Sunday 9pm – Budawang
– Monday 10:30am – Budawang
Tuesday 29th March – Smith’s Alternative, Canberra, ACT
Wednesday 30th March – The Exchange Hotel, Sydney, NSW

« Older entries Newer entries »

%d bloggers like this: